How to Help Someone Struggling with Thoughts of Suicide

According to a report released by The Centers for Disease Control, suicide rates have risen in all but one state in the United States between 1999 and 2016. In more than half of all deaths in 27 states, the person who committed suicide had no known mental health condition when they took their lives.

In 2016, nearly 45,000 suicides occurred in The United States. Particularly alarming are the statistics showing that in 2016, over 115,000 suicide attempts by adolescents were reported in U.S. hospitals.

The general thinking on the cause of this rise of suicidal ideation in teens and adults seems to have its roots in a lack of mental health treatment in the U.S., a rise in Substance abuse, alcohol abuse, and drug addiction, and a continued rise in the connection between cell phones, social media, and depression.

According to a 2017 study, teenagers are more likely to consider suicide when they spend more than 5 hours per day on their devices. Even though teenagers are considered to be under more pressure at school, this does not turn out to affect depression rates among those studied.

It’s important to know that there are things you can do if you know someone who is struggling with suicide:

  1. Reach out for help, suicidal ideation/depression/and substance abuse are treatable conditions. If you know someone who is struggling, they don’t have to suffer in silence. Google mental health treatment near me or addiction treatment near me to find a local resource. Tell the person they do not have to be ashamed, this is something that can be resolved.
  2. Drugs and Alcohol. Some drugs and alcohol generally act as depressants. If the person saying they are suicidal or depressed is a regular user, getting help for addiction and alcohol use can change depression and suicidal ideation.
  3. Take threats seriously. If someone you know says they are suicidal, contact your local non-emergency line and have the professionals assess them. Other resources can be found here.
  4. Listen and share. Listen to the person who is saying they are suicidal, share your feelings and let the person know that you care about them and are willing to walk with them as they get help.
  5. Get outside. If someone is claiming they are depressed or have had suicidal urges in the past, fresh air and exercise can quickly change their outlook.
  6. Weapons. If you have weapons in the house, they should be removed immediately. Suicide by firearm is the main method of suicide in the America.

At The Redpoint Center we know that suicide and addiction or alcohol abuse go hand in hand. Out staff are professional trained to handle mental health crisis’s, substance use and abuse, and suicidal ideation. We specialize in working with teens, young adults, and adults who struggle with these co-occurring conditions.

If you or someone you know is struggling with suicide, depression, or substance problems, call us at (888) 509-3153 to speak with a highly trained admissions coordinator. If our services don’t fit, we will personally help you find resources that do.

We are here to help.



Address

The Redpoint Center
1375 Kenn Pratt Blvd
Suite 300
Longmont, CO, 80501


Phone

(888) 509-3153


 

Contact Us.