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Mental Health

Redpoint Center Mental Health Substance Use Treatment Featured CBS4 News

CBS4 News Features Redpoint Center as Coronavirus Support Resource

By | Longmont Drug Rehab, Mental Health, Treatment

Redpoint Center is thrilled to be featured as an important mental health and substance use resource for our community. The following article is featured on Colorado CBS4 news. Colorado officials have many different ways they can help people who are struggling, especially during the COVID-19 outbreak. That includes finding treatment centers or getting connected with the Colorado Crisis Line. The state’s addiction and behavioral health facilities may not be able to hold meetings in-person, but they’re helping more people than before because of a new way of life for many people in isolation.

“I think it’s been a challenge to see how do we meet the needs of people that we treat,” said Cody Gardner, the founder of The Redpoint Center in Longmont. “Now that we’re able to provide these telehealth services, we’ve actually seen an uptick in the number of clients attending groups, attending their individual sessions. I also think people are really looking for support right now.”

Coronavirus and Mental Health Support

Normally The Redpoint Center hosts three-hour group meetings twice a day at its office. Now those are taking place online, which comes with its challenges.

“Groups provide an opportunity for people to work with their peers, and to receive feedback and talk about what’s going on in their lives and learn new skills. We know that coming together as a group, although it can be uncomfortable, can bring them back into the community, to bring them back into society and build the tools they need to stay sober,” Gardner said.

In the two years the center has been open, it has already helped 300 people with everything from addiction to drugs or alcohol to depression and anxiety.

“(Coloradans) are really looking for a place to talk about the anxiety they feel and the uncertainty of the future. How do I not use these drugs and alcohol today? What are the practical things I can do like get out of the house, talk to somebody who knows what’s going on in my life, doing therapy? These are fundamental for just staying sober today,” Gardner said.

Staying Connected

“I’d just be sitting at home. I can’t go to AA meetings because those are all canceled, too. So being able to talk to a therapist, and my peers in a video chat setting, it’s super beneficial,” said a patient named Andy, who started getting help at The Redpoint Center almost a year ago.

Andy says he and others recovering from addiction are really battling through the challenge of the stay-at-home guidelines that have come with the coronavirus outbreak in Colorado, but the virtual group meetings are helping.

Coronavirus Quarantine

“The hardest part is boredom and not knowing what to do with yourself. And being quarantined at home, that’s what a lot of alcoholics and drug addicts do anyway, is just use and drink at home,” he said. “They teach us here that the opposite of addiction is connection and a part of that, if we can’t meet in person, it’s video chat online and I think it’s super beneficial.”

Gardner is hoping people will take this time in and get help.

“They’re seeking out support, they know something is going on and they’re struggling with anxiety every day. Talk to somebody, find somebody that you can talk to, that you can get support from. Nobody knows what is going to come next and we all need to step up and support each other,” he said.

LINK: COVID-19 & Behavioral Health | Colorado Ladders

More Coronavirus Support Resources:
Safe2Tell
An anonymous way for students, parents, school staff and community members to report concerns regarding their safety or the safety of others

1-877-542-7233

The Trevor Project
Crisis prevention and suicide prevention for LGBTQ+ youth

1-866-488-7386

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline
24/7, free and confidential support for people in distress, prevention and crisis resources for you or your loved ones, and best practices for professionals
1-800-273-8255

Mobile Crisis Services, Denver Health
24/7 service that provides mental health support to residents of the city and county of Denver and to Mental Health Center of Denver consumers during and after a crisis

Redpoint Center COVID-19 Recovery Support Coronavirus Sober

COVID-19, Quarantine, and Life in Recovery

By | Community, Mental Health
COVID-19 is the illness caused by the Coronavirus. Life as we know it has been brought to a halt by COVID-19. For many, uncertainty and change generates a high level of anxiety. There may be anxiety coming from the slow pace and the lack of “things to do.” Many of us are accustomed to a fast-paced lifestyle. An average day may consist of driving the kids to school, going to an appointment, going to work, running out for lunch, going back to work, picking up the kids, driving them to their after-school activities, making dinner, attending nightly commitments, and so on. For the time being, most of that is canceled or postponed. While it feels different from our normal lives, we can appreciate and take advantage of this pause. The fear of the unknown, the threat of illness, or concern around financial hardship are all valid. But, there is an opportunity to find positivity that lies beneath the turmoil.

Slowing Down for COVID-19

Most of us talk about how nice it would be to slow down. Our lives move fast. COVID-19 is forcing us all to do this. Many of us have extra time with family now. In addition, we can read books out loud with the kids. Perhaps there’s time to cook dinner together with a significant other or reconnect with family members who live far away. We have extra time with pets, who appreciate more cuddles and playtime. Now could be the perfect time to finally start digging into that stack of books you have been wanting to read. It’s also a good time for finishing or starting a home improvement project. This pause came at a perfect time to allow us more space in our schedules to do some spring cleaning,  a puzzle, or start learning how to knit, dance, or finally hop on that Peloton bike that hasn’t been touched since Christmas. In fact, maybe now that you’ve had to stop moving so fast, you notice that you haven’t been taking the best care of yourself. Maybe now is a great time to finally look at getting a therapist, going through an online treatment program to address a detrimental relationship with substances, or beginning a new meditation routine.

Taking Care of Ourselves

Many have hoped for some relief, a break, a few “extra hours in the day”. Well, like it or not, that time has come. COVID-19 is happening. But we can control our attitudes and our actions.
“I, for one, am going to enjoy this rare pause and as my body has begun to slow down, I will allow my mind to slow down as well,” says Rachael Messaros, individual in long-term recovery and Director of Admissions & Marketing at Redpoint.
As always, a reminder that if you or someone you love is in need of therapeutic support, we are here. Redpoint Center is fully operating, using telehealth tools to stay connected to our clients. Now, more than ever, we need each other.
Redpoint Center Rehab Exercise for Recovery

Exercise for Recovery

By | Addiction, Mental Health, Treatment
Exercise for recovery can be a powerful practice. Recovery looks a little different for everyone. An important part of one person’s journey may not play as significant of a part in someone else’s. That being said, scientific evidence shows that exercise is an important tool for a healthy mind and body—a key component of recovery. Medical professionals are recommending the benefits of physical activity and its many mental health applications. However, establishing a routine exercise regimen is something that forces many to struggle. Here are a couple of reasons to get off the couch and move your body.

Exercise for Recovery and Mental Health

For many, exercise has powerful mental health benefits. The research validates this fact. To start, exercise for many can be a form of meditation. It creates the space and time to simply be present. Much of recovery is about learning to live in the present moment. Fears, doubts, insecurities, and anxieties typically live in the past and the future. When you’re engaged in cardio, practicing yoga, or lifting weights, you are aware of your heartbeat and your breath. Furthermore, you are quieting the mind and initiating the release of endorphins, which generate a greater sense of ease and calm. Tapping into the body and remaining present is a meditative experience.
In addition, exercise is a powerful, and completely natural, anti-depressant. It is also free, depending on what activities you enjoy. The chemical release that occurs during physical exercise is proven to be as effective as leading anti-depressant medications (without the negative side effects) when treating mild to moderate depression. “Even if it’s a temporary fix, I can count on 30 hard minutes on the Stairmaster to rescue me from my own mind,” says Rachael Messaros, outreach coordinator at the Redpoint Center.
Exercise provides structure and leads to healthy choices. Sometimes we just need a reason to get out of bed in the morning and starting the day with movement sets us up for a far better day. “When I can work exercise into my weekly routine, it provides me with a healthy structure and promotes self-care. It provides evidence that I am taking time out of the day to make a healthy decision for myself, which in turn leads to more of the same, like eating well and getting enough rest,” adds Rachael.

Exercise as a Spiritual Practice

Exercise for recovery can be a spiritual practice for many of us. While exercising in nature we are more attuned to the greater world around us. In addition, even riding the cardio bike in the class at the gym can help you feel connected to something bigger than yourself. We become more aware of a sense of connectivity.
“Nature nourishes my soul, and so do other humans working towards a similar goal,”—Rachael Massaros, Outreach Coordinator at Redpoint Center
As mentioned before, what works for one person doesn’t always resonate with another. There is however a growing body of evidence that suggests getting outside (or inside) and moving your body has significant benefits for not only physical but also mental health. Perhaps the two aren’t so different from one another in the first place.
What to Expect in Longmont and Boulder Sober Living

Longmont and Boulder Sober Living – What to Expect

By | Addiction, Community, Mental Health

You or a loved one has completed residential treatment, now what? First of all, congratulations. Taking and completing that step is a huge one in and of itself. Typically the next step on the road of recovery after rehab is a sober living environment. A sober living home is a supervised, structured space in which folks new to recovery live. Accountability and monitoring are key components to what makes a sober living environment work effectively. In addition, these elements are key to help people stay sober throughout the transition between residential treatment and independent living.

How Does Sober Living Work

Sober living homes provide a safe, structured environment for individuals to learn how to thrive in recovery. These homes are a vital part of the recovery process. Often, those new to recovery start to get back to daily living while in a sober house. In addition, sober homes provide camaraderie and peer support. Studies show that sober homes can increase the likelihood of long-term recovery.

How long do people stay in sober living? There is no set answer to this question. Some people are in sober living for as many as two years, some as short as a few months. Different people need varying levels of accountability and monitoring. Furthermore, a supportive living environment offers different lengths of time because some need more or less structured than others. Hence, the main idea of sober living is a group environment to learn how to practice the tools learned in treatment before living independently.

How to Find a Quality Longmont or Boulder Sober Living House

Professionals, especially clinicians and staff at inpatient or intensive outpatient programs are great resources to rely on. In fact, professional services are ideal when navigating your needs or the needs of your loved one. Those in the recovery field have experience with the varied types of programs and can make the best recommendation based on the individual.

Sober living homes are often helpful to live in when a person is in an intensive outpatient program or partial hospitalization program. In addition, IOP or PHP helps to provide safety and understanding while that person is continuing therapeutic work at the treatment level. Peer support and safe housing is often recommended by a treatment team at this stage because of the risks associated with immediately going back to life as we once knew it. Consequently, when we return the same environment in which we were living prior to treatment, it can be stressful. Also, we may feel loneliness, misunderstanding, or simply have too much responsibility too soon.

Sober Houses = Healthy Living

Colorado-based recovery speaker Don C. often likens this process to the replanting of a dying tree into new soil. If a tree is dying, the soil in which it exists is often unhealthy. To rehabilitate that tree, one must relocate that same tree into new, healthy soil. Often, when that tree is relocated, it tends to thrive and pick up the nutrients from the new soil. Sober homes can be thought of in a similar way. It is the new soil and environment in which someone can begin to build their new life in recovery, rich in the nutrients of daily peer support, and monitoring. Hence, one builds the life skills needed to operate successfully in the world. Community and accountability are two keys to early recovery. A sober house is often the right choice for a person in early recovery to transition back to independence.

Joint Commission Gold Seal Excellence Addiction Treatment

The Redpoint Center Awarded Accreditation from The Joint Commission

By | Mental Health, Treatment

The Redpoint Center of Boulder County, Colorado, earned The Joint Commission’s Gold Seal of Approval® Accreditation. This Gold Seal is awarded after demonstrating compliance with the necessary performance standards. Furthermore, it is a symbol of quality that reflects a health care organization’s commitment to providing safe and quality patient care. In addition, the Joint Commission Accreditation ensures clients feel completely confident in the mental health and substance abuse treatment they receive. Hence, it is literally the gold standard when it comes to drug rehab and mental health care.

The Redpoint Center fulfilled a rigorous, unannounced onsite review of its outpatient and inpatient treatment programs. During the visit, a team of Joint Commission reviewers evaluates compliance standards spanning several areas. Furthermore, they review every aspect of the program. Hence, this includes individual clinical treatment, experiential modalities, addiction treatment care, and overall excellence.

Joint Commission: The Best in Addiction Treatment

The Joint Commission’s standards are developed by an exemplary team in consultation with health care experts and providers, measurement experts and patients. They are informed by scientific literature and expert consensus to help behavioral health care organizations measure, assess and improve performance. The surveyors also conduct onsite observations and interviews. Consequently, the process is rigorous and attentive to every detail of care.

“As a private accreditor, The Joint Commission surveys health care organizations to protect the public by identifying deficiencies in care and working with those organizations to correct them as quickly and sustainably as possible,” says Mark Pelletier, RN, MS, chief operating officer, Accreditation and Certification Operations, and chief nursing executive, The Joint Commission. “We commend The Redpoint Center for its continuous quality improvement efforts in patient safety and quality of care.”

Boulder County Addiction Rehab: Compassionate Care

“We are thrilled that The Redpoint Center meets every aspect of the intensive Joint Commission compliance process. This is a huge milestone for our Colorado addiction treatment facility. In addition, this will allow us to continue to serve the Boulder County rehab needs, and beyond,” says Cody Gardner, founder, and CEO of The Redpoint Center. “It’s an honor to provide the much-needed mental health and substance use disorder treatment needs of Colorado,” Gardner added. The Redpoint Center provides compassionate care to Boulder County, as well as other areas of Colorado where drug addiction treatment is desperately needed. “The more we can provide thoughtful recovery services to a community in need, the greater our mission is actualized,” adds Gardner.

For more information on the accreditation, please visit The Joint Commission website.

The Redpoint Center is an outpatient substance abuse treatment center. Located in Longmont, Colorado, Redpoint Center empowers clients through robust addiction treatment programming. Redpoint’s team teaches clients practical recovery skills through a multi-layered approach to addressing trauma and addiction. As the premier Boulder County mental health and drug rehab treatment center, Redpoint Center provides excellence in care.

Redpoint Center Blog How Have Happy Sober Holidays

Top 10 Tips for Happy Sober Holidays

By | Mental Health, Treatment

So It’s Your First Holiday Sober…

Sober holidays can be a blast. They can also be challenging, stressful, and triggering. Following a number of troubled years and difficult decisions, in the fall of 2006, I checked into a treatment center for alcohol and heroin. I had a handful of unsuccessful treatment experiences before this. When I entered treatment, I was skeptical of my ability to be sober and find recovery.

Fortunately, when in treatment I began building relationships and doing “the work” that would ultimately sustain me in long-term-recovery. Following 40 days of rehab, I went to sober living and was able to quickly find employment. Luckily for me, this job afforded me the opportunity to spend a significant amount of time attending 12-step meetings and other recovery-oriented activities.

Holiday Season and Sobriety

As time was passing and my recovery was progressing, I did not think much about the holidays. I can remember hearing people say, “Alcoholism is a three-fold disease; Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s.” I remember having a vague idea that I ought to consider that the holidays were coming, but I was living day-to-day and focusing most of my energy on staying sober.

My parents had a quiet Thanksgiving in Boulder County that year and were very happy with my sobriety. I have vivid memories of going back to their house and following through with what my sponsor had told me. “This is not the time to spend with friends. In addition, while you are home, see where you can contribute. Wake up early, ask how you can be helpful, do the dishes without having to be asked. Clean up after yourself and go to bed early.” In the trust-building phase of early recovery, this is sage advice.

Christmas is where it got messy. I remember being at my job in early December in Boulder County. I got invited to a holiday party with a co-worker. She knew that I did not have a lot going on and I think she thought that inviting me would help me make friends. I was still in my first 90 days of sobriety. Without thinking, I accepted the invitation.

Surviving Sober Holiday Parties

On the night of the party, I went to her house to meet her in Weld County and she told me that the party was an hour away and that she would drive. I can remember thinking I would have preferred to drive, but I acquiesced rather quickly to getting in her car. I had yet to find my voice (and these were the days before Google maps!).

We drove for over an hour to Northern Colorado and ended up at a big holiday party. Immediately walking through the front door, I was offered a beer. I politely refused. After being introduced to a few people, the uncle of the woman I was with started badgering me about having some homemade whiskey. He offered and I said no thank you. Then, he asked why I wasn’t drinking and I said I didn’t feel like it. Next, he said, “Its just one drink, what’s the problem,” I replied that he, “Didn’t want to see me drinking.”

He didn’t really get the joke, but luckily the woman I was with saw that I was struggling and came over and saved me. I walked with her for a minute and then excused myself.

Outside in the driveway, I frantically called my sponsor. He answered and I explained the situation. I can remember saying to him, “Maybe that guy is right. It’s just one. Also, the people at the sober house wouldn’t even know.” Like all good sponsors, he talked me through it. He helped me remember my life and asked me to explain some instances where I intended to have “just one” and had drunk myself into oblivion. Furthermore, he stayed on the phone with me for over an hour. He told me if anyone offered me any more booze to just say, “I am allergic to alcohol; I can’t drink it.”

After returning, re-committed to sobriety, I tried to enjoy the rest of the night and couldn’t wait to get back to my car. A friend once said to me, “I just don’t want to lose my place in line,” when referencing sobriety. Today, I can look back and say how grateful I am for holding my “place in line.”

In retrospect, I wish someone had given me a bigger list of things to consider during the holidays. Each situation is different and many of us struggle with creative ways to make it through sober holidays, parties, families, etc. The key is remembering you are not alone. Whether we decide to avoid social gatherings or go out and do volunteer work, the holiday season can be fulfilling. But we need to know how to do it.

Below are my top 10 tips of advice for someone in their first holiday season in recovery.

10 Sober Holidays Tips

  1. You drive. Always insist on driving or taking your own car. This is my #1 piece of advice.
  2. Buddy up. Try to attend functions with other sober people. Having at least one person who understands what you are attempting is vital.
  3. Drink up. You’re sober! Have something in your hand. My preferred drink is cranberry and soda water (but I will occasionally confirm the bartender that there is no booze in the drink). I have a friend who brings lollipops to parties so she has a treat.
  4. Be direct. Don’t be afraid to tell people that you don’t drink. Additionally, don’t feel compelled to tell people why. Most will accept your response the first time without the “why”.
  5. Have an exit strategy. Make sure that you know you can leave and know where you will go if you feel triggered. Preparation is key.
  6. Plan, plan, plan. If you are traveling for the holidays, look up recovery meetings or connect with someone local that you can reach out to if you need extra support.
  7. Plan your self-care. The holidays can get hectic, quickly. Make sure that before you attend any holiday event you have given yourself enough downtime to prepare internally for anything that might come up.
  8. Connect with family. If you can, let family know in advance that you are going to be sober this year at the holiday event. Your family does not have to make sure that you stay sober (they are not security guards), but informing them prior that you will not be drinking can be very helpful if you feel triggered at the event or need extra space.
  9. Set boundaries. Additionally, to the point above, if family is not supportive or is not is going to add to your overall recovery plan, set boundaries. You don’t have to do anything that will damage your mental health. Feelings of shame, doubt, and possibly guilt might arise, but if you are truly on the path to recovery, staying sober is the number one priority. Hold those boundaries.
  10. Skip it. Lastly, adding to the above idea. You don’t have to do any of it. If you believe that you will not be able to stay sober at one event or another, DON’T GO. You are worth it and there will be next year when you feel more secure in your sobriety.

In conclusion, know that the holidays sober can be a beautiful time. You don’t have to be afraid of anything. The key is being prepared for what may come. And if you’re mindful of your sobriety, the holidays are actually more magical than they ever were before. You will remember everything that happened, you will enjoy the beauty of winter festivities, and you will remember you’re on the path to recovery. This is a beautiful thing.

If you or someone you love is struggling during the holiday season, reach out for help. You can call us, any time, and we will provide professional support for you and your loved ones. Our Boulder County rehab offers top-level expertise in alcohol and substance abuse treatment.

How To Talk Teens About Addiction

How to Talk to Teens About Addiction

By | Addiction, Mental Health

How do you talk to a teen about addiction? Do we really need to talk to teens about addiction? Adolescence is a time of experimentation. Teens engage in high-risk behavior such as drug use, alcohol use, sexual relationships, and potentially illegal behaviors. Every year there are stories about how some of these teen behaviors have gone wrong. No parent wants their teen to be hurt. In addition, no one wants to see teens make decisions that can cause them harm. Or worse, that could affect the rest of their lives.

Talk to Teens About Addiction

Relationships are all about connection. Furthermore, this connection comes through communication. At our drug rehab, The Redpoint Center, in Boulder County, Colorado, we work with families and teens to create healthy, realistic conversations about drug and alcohol use. We often receive questions from parents asking us how they can have conversations about addiction with their teens. Below are some tips to how to talk to your teen about their drug or alcohol use:

  • Think about the setting. It is not recommended to bring these topics up with other people around. Wait until your teen is relaxed and calm so you can truly connect.
  • Avoid a punitive or condemning tone. The idea is to have a conversation about drugs and alcohol that is reasonable. In addition, it is key to emphasize that no one is in trouble. You just want to learn more and share ideas on the topic.
  • Open-Ended questions spark discussion. Ask open-ended questions. These are questions that lead to deeper conversation. The answer would not be “Yes” or “No.” For instance, “What have you heard about opiates in school?” is a very different question than “Have you heard about the opiate problem in school?” The first question requires discussion.
  • Support positive peer awareness. Ask what your teen has heard and seen about drugs and alcohol in their peer groups. Has anyone been hurt? Has anyone had to get treatment?
  • Be curious and conversational. If you know your teen has used drugs and alcohol in the past, ask what the experience was like. This is not always easy to hear, we know. Try to stay curious without getting activated or worried. Ask a teen if they ever felt like they were having a problem with drugs and alcohol what would they do? In addition, make sure there is a clear support network. If you’re not the person they wish to come to, make sure they feel they have folks they can rely on. That might be a close family friend, a teacher, a priest or a pastor. The key is ensuring teens have the support they need.

Supporting Teen Mental Health and Awareness

The key to positive mental health and good communication is awareness. When we model awareness for our children, they learn through action, not just through words. This is very important. Model patience, kindness, and a willingness to forgo judgment. This doesn’t mean we don’t teach discernment. We do. But, we also share the wisdom of positive life skills for developing minds. And this means everything.

Here are some steps to cultivate deeper awareness.

  • Teach teens how to respond to trouble. Do teens know what to do if someone is in trouble? What if they’re offered a substance? Do you have a codeword or phrase to share within the family in case a teen is in a situation they don’t want to be in? This is a powerful way to forge a solid alliance of trust.
  • Set boundaries. Each parent or caregiver will need to decide how they want to relate to their loved one and substance use. It is completely acceptable to let your teen know what the response will be if they continue to use these substances, this can include consequences.
  • Be sure they talk. Most importantly, even if your teen does not want to talk to you about these subjects, encourage them to find someone, anyone who is a safe person to discuss these problems with. Let them know that they can come to you if they need help, that you will not punish them for seeking help.
  • Seek professional support. Lastly, research options for treatment and therapy in your local community before talking to your teen. If they disclose that they would be open to some type of treatment, make sure you have options on hand.

Seeking Guidance

What teens really need is us. Adults need to talk to teens about addiction and substance use. And, they need our attention, openness, and compassion. It is not always easy. Teens can test even the strongest adult. But the payoff of truly attending to our kids is beyond measure. If we cultivate relationships every step of the way, during a child’s life, we build trust. Hence, trust is the bedrock of a solid relationship.

If you or someone you know is in need of support, seek professional help. Feel free to call us. We can help guide you and your loved ones on the path to recovery. As the top-rated addiction treatment provider in Boulder County, Colorado, we know how to help those in need. Even if our services are not the right fit, we will help you find what works.

 

If you or someone you know is struggling with alcohol addiction, please do not hesitate to reach out to us.
Redpoint Center Addiction Treatment Relationships Recovery

Relationships in Addiction Recovery

By | Mental Health, Treatment

Relationships in recovery can be complicated. And relationships take time to build or mend. Over the past decade, major strides have been made to de-stigmatize addiction and mental health concerns. The scientific consensus is clear, addiction is a diagnosable, treatable condition of the brain. Although there are similarities to other treatable conditions, there are also specific challenges for those in recovery. Of these, mending broken relationships is at the top of one’s list when in recovery.

Damaged Relationships Before Recovery

Many people living in active addiction behave erratically. The central tenet of the disease model concept is that the brain becomes “hijacked” by the chemicals that produce happiness. Thus, people are willing to engage in erratic, dangerous, and alienating behaviors.

Relationships require work. Furthermore, new behaviors take time to develop. Some of these include accountability, dependability, and awareness. While using substances, we often sacrifice healthy relationships to consume drugs or alcohol. Sadly, many die due to substance and alcohol use disorders and can never mend what’s been damaged. But, in recovery we can work on relationships and devote attention to their evolution.

Luckily, with proper treatment, those who enter into recovery can slowly re-build the relationships that matter most to them. Healthy relationships aid in long term recovery. It is through connection that we nourish relationships in recovery.

Tips for Healing Relationships

  • Communication. The foundation of any good relationship is communication. In active addiction, we may manipulate and create facades that protect the addiction. To start mending relationships in recovery, we need to communicate regularly and clearly. In the beginning, we may just explain that we are working on changing behaviors. In addition, we may note that we fully understand the harm caused during active addiction. Furthermore, we can let others know that this will be addressed in the future. For now, the focus is working on being honest. This includes following through and staying sober, no matter what. Read our post about what to expect in sober living.
  • Trust. Trust can be lacking in the early stages of recovery. Acknowledging this and coming up with plans to build trust is beneficial. Maybe its regular, planned check-ins. Maybe it is a meeting with a professional counselor. No matter what, trust-building will take time.
  • Setting realistic expectations. Although most people want to immediately fix the harm they have done, this may not be possible or appropriate in the beginning. Talking through the process of recovery, the commitment to treatment and the timeline for goals can be invaluable in the process.

The beauty of sobriety is that we can focus on ourselves and those we love. When we walk the recovery path, we’re willing to learn, to grow, to evolve. In addition, our loved ones can see the shift. It is truly magical. If you or someone you love is in need of support, professional help is available. The caring guidance of a thoughtful mentor or clinician can lead to better communication skills. Don’t wait for true connection and real happiness.

Redpoint Center Teen Addiction Treatment

The Difference Between Adult and Teen Addiction Treatment

By | Addiction, Alcohol rehab, Mental Health, Therapy, Treatment

What are the differences between youth and adult addiction treatment?

As rates of suicide, suicidal ideation, depression, anxiety, and substance use disorder rise in Colorado, and the United States, more teen addiction treatment expands. Furthermore, parents seek teen addiction treatment that also provides mental health counseling and professional support for the family unit. Hence, families, in general, are more aware of addiction and mental health concerns and their systemic nature. Therefore professional addiction treatment that supports the entire family is key.

Teen Addiction Factors and Treatment Modalities

Although the teen addiction treatment paradigm is generally the same as adult: Residential, PHP, IOP, OP, etc., the needs of adolescents vary significantly from adults. While, for adults, the predictive factors for recovery are employment, financial stability, community engagement, duration of use, the intensity of use, marriage, parenthood, mental health treatment, etc., for youth there are different predictive factors.

For teens and adolescents, the factors that support positive recovery are: educational engagement, positive family influences, positive peer influences, pro-social leisure activities, etc. In addition, high school drug and alcohol use and abuse concerns, as well as rates of youth mental health and suicidal ideation, drive deeper concern. Teen addiction treatment centers need to respond to these specific needs. Furthermore, teen treatment needs to provide options that don’t just treat the symptoms but address the cause.

Hence, both adult and adolescent care require professional support but teen treatment requires family integration.

Parenting Teens with Substance Use Disorder

It’s important that parents receive professional support during the teen addiction treatment process. When an adolescent is struggling it impacts the entire family. In addition, there is often a previous trauma or behavioral pattern that informs destructive habits. Consequently, parents need guidance and therapeutic care during treatment. Along with professional support, parents need tips on dealing with teens when it comes to teen rehab treatment.

Here are some simple tips to remember.

  1. Breathe. It’s going to be OK. Stress plays a role in mental health and substance use struggles. Minimize it as best as you can. This means slowing down, taking a breath, and remembering that deep breaths help your parasympathetic nervous system mitigate stress.
  2. Be compassionate. It’s scary for you AND your teen to navigate this time. So hold compassion for all involved.
  3. Practice self-care. When we care for ourselves, we can show up for others as our best selves. This is crucial for parents.

Addiction Treatment & Professional Support

At The Redpoint Center, a teen and adult addiction treatment in Boulder County, Colorado, we offer specific treatment programs that address the individual. In our adult program, we focus on practical recovery tools so clients maintain their sobriety while living in the community. For our youth treatment program, we focus on family relationships, educational support, leisure activities that expose teens and young adults to healthy habits that do not involve substance use. In addition, we provide parent support groups and parenting workshops. Parent counseling is a key part of any good treatment plan. Compassionate care treats clients holistically, meeting them where they are.

“It’s important to treat the individual compassionately, based on where they are in their lives.”— Cody Gardner, Founder of The Redpoint Center.

As always, when considering a treatment program for your loved one, it is recommended to ask questions about how that treatment center will specifically address your loved one’s needs.

Redpoint Center Treatment Interventions

What is an Intervention?

By | Addiction, Alcohol rehab, Longmont Drug Rehab, Mental Health, Treatment

Interventions are a strong first component of recovery. Not only do they help families through a complex process, but they also provide professional guidance for treatment. Furthermore, interventionists help reduce the burden of shame and stigma. This value is immeasurable. Over the past 15 years, the stigma of addiction in America is decreasing. What used to be considered a moral or ethical failing is now considered a treatable condition. Groups like Facing Addiction, SAHMSA, and Shatterproof, work tirelessly to help others. In addition, these nonprofits help Americans understand that addiction and alcoholism can be overcome through treatment, communities, and cultural compassion. Interventionists do the same and offer powerful support along the way.

As more people learn that addiction is a treatable condition, people ask, “How can I get someone help?” Furthermore, when someone is in destructive patterns, it can be hard to stop. Also, it can be even harder to convince them they need to change their ways.

What is an Intervention?

Premiering on March 6, 2005, “Intervention,” an A&E TV show, depicts family struggles when helping a loved one to seek drug rehab or mental health treatment. The show depicts participants using drugs and alcohol and subjects use interventionists as a wake-up call for family members. Interventionists are a key part of the process.

Interventionists usually make contact with the family, to start, to get a better understanding of what’s happening. Following an information gather process, the interventionist meets with the family to determine a course of action. In addition, they may work with clinical support to ensure the methods chosen are sound. They may also use various tactics to implore the person to accept treatment help. Following acceptance, the person goes immediately to treatment, generally for a minimum of 60–90 days.

In 15 seasons of the TV show, only 4 participants refused treatment. While the TV show can be helpful for families to understand the process there are many factors that can impact the experience. Therefore, it is best to find the right interventionist for each situation.

Questions to Ask Regarding Interventions

  • What credential does the interventionist possess? There most highly coveted credential is the Certified Intervention Professional (CIP).
  • What style of intervention will be used? Johnson Model, Love first , ARISE Model, Not all models are equal.
  • Is the interventionist a licensed therapist or registered psychotherapist?
  • What will happen if my loved one refuses? Will you continue to help?
  • Is there any type of follow-up from the interventionist following next steps?
  • Does the interventionist help with aftercare.

Make sure all of your questions are answered. As an advocate for your family, you have every right to make sure you have all the information you need. This is critical. It is also vital that you gain the support and trust of a seasoned professional in the field.  At The Redpoint Center, in Longmont, Colorado, we can help with conducting an intervention. Our licensed, trained staff conduct dozens of interventions a year. Supporting families as they navigate the complex system of treatment is a core component of our mission. We regularly refer families to different treatment center’s when our program is not the right fit. This is what a good interventionist does—they work for you.

Call today for a complimentary phone assessment. We are here for you and your family every step of the way.

You are not alone.

We are here to help.



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