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Redpoint Center Teen Addiction Treatment

The Difference Between Adult and Teen Addiction Treatment

By | Addiction, Alcohol rehab, Mental Health, Therapy, Treatment | No Comments

What are the differences between youth and adult addiction treatment?

As rates of suicide, suicidal ideation, depression, anxiety, and substance use disorder rise in Colorado, and the United States, more teen addiction treatment expands. Furthermore, parents seek teen addiction treatment that also provides mental health counseling and professional support for the family unit. Hence, families, in general, are more aware of addiction and mental health concerns and their systemic nature. Therefore professional addiction treatment that supports the entire family is key.

Teen Addiction Factors and Treatment Modalities

Although the teen addiction treatment paradigm is generally the same as adult: Residential, PHP, IOP, OP, etc., the needs of adolescents vary significantly from adults. While, for adults, the predictive factors for recovery are employment, financial stability, community engagement, duration of use, the intensity of use, marriage, parenthood, mental health treatment, etc., for youth there are different predictive factors.

For teens and adolescents, the factors that support positive recovery are: educational engagement, positive family influences, positive peer influences, pro-social leisure activities, etc. In addition, high school drug and alcohol use and abuse concerns, as well as rates of youth mental health and suicidal ideation, drive deeper concern. Teen addiction treatment centers need to respond to these specific needs. Furthermore, teen treatment needs to provide options that don’t just treat the symptoms but address the cause.

Hence, both adult and adolescent care require professional support but teen treatment requires family integration.

Parenting Teens with Substance Use Disorder

It’s important that parents receive professional support during the teen addiction treatment process. When an adolescent is struggling it impacts the entire family. In addition, there is often a previous trauma or behavioral pattern that informs destructive habits. Consequently, parents need guidance and therapeutic care during treatment. Along with professional support, parents need tips on dealing with teens when it comes to teen rehab treatment.

Here are some simple tips to remember.

  1. Breathe. It’s going to be OK. Stress plays a role in mental health and substance use struggles. Minimize it as best as you can. This means slowing down, taking a breath, and remembering that deep breaths help your parasympathetic nervous system mitigate stress.
  2. Be compassionate. It’s scary for you AND your teen to navigate this time. So hold compassion for all involved.
  3. Practice self-care. When we care for ourselves, we can show up for others as our best selves. This is crucial for parents.

Addiction Treatment & Professional Support

At The Redpoint Center, a teen and adult addiction treatment in Longmont, Colorado, we offer specific treatment programs that address the individual. In our adult program, we focus on practical recovery tools so clients maintain their sobriety while living in the community. For our youth treatment program, we focus on family relationships, educational support, leisure activities that expose teens and young adults to healthy habits that do not involve substance use. In addition, we provide parent support groups and parenting workshops. Parent counseling is a key part of any good treatment plan. Compassionate care treats clients holistically, meeting them where they are.

“It’s important to treat the individual compassionately, based on where they are in their lives.”— Cody Gardner, Founder of The Redpoint Center.

As always, when considering a treatment program for your loved one, it is recommended to ask questions about how that treatment center will specifically address your loved one’s needs.

The Importance of Self-Care in Recovery

By | Addiction, Alcohol rehab, Community, Longmont Drug Rehab, Mental Health, Therapy, Treatment | No Comments

Self-care in recovery is key. After struggling, a person can believe that they are not good enough. And they may feel they don’t measure up. This is what I thought about myself.

In active addiction, I didn’t take care of myself. I wouldn’t wear my seat belt all the time. In addition, I had a bad diet. Furthermore, at times I would even skip showering.

Substance use disorder negatively affects self-perception, mood, motivation. Also, it can hinder personal well-being. It can make you feel overwhelmed and bad about yourself. Hence, at times it seems there is no way out.

When I finally got sober I wasn’t sure what self-care meant anymore. There were mentors to show me the way, including our founder at Redpoint. I also internalized self-care as being selfish. During my active addiction, I had been selfish for so long that the last thing I wanted to do was pay attention to the things that I needed.

Self-Care in Recovery — The Opposite of Selfish

I realize now that there is a difference between being selfish and taking care of yourself. What I learned was that you need to implement self-care when you get sober so that you can replace selfish, addictive behavior with healthy alternatives.

Once you are addicted to alcohol or other drugs, it is common to use these addictive behaviors to cope with negative feelings. Some even use these addictive behaviors as a type of reward system for themselves.

During my active addiction, it got to the point where I would tell myself, “I worked all day today, so I deserve to get high.” Or “my boyfriend made me mad, so I can get high to make myself feel better.”

Now, I take care of myself. Self-care in recovery means I work out, do art, get my nails done, and take time out of my day to just sit and think. By doing this, I can change my own thoughts about myself and my life.

Now, the more I take care of myself and the better I feel, the more I want to keep that feeling going. I also know that in order to keep this positive feeling going, I need to keep working on myself, help others and maintain my sobriety.  This self-growth is an important part of self-care.

When I was using, I couldn’t take care of myself, let alone help someone else. Now that I take time out for myself, I have more positive energy to help other people.

I’m a huge fan of self-care now. If you haven’t tried it, I would HIGHLY recommend it. Don’t miss out. You deserve to be truly happy.

-Samantha

Is Addiction a Family Disease? 

By | Addiction, Alcohol rehab, Community, Longmont Drug Rehab, Mental Health, Therapy, Treatment | No Comments

Is addiction a family disease? What does this mean? Those suffering from addictive behaviors are suffering. And their loved ones suffer immensely, too. It goes without saying that living with substance use disorder is incredibly difficult. 

When someone using drugs begins to hurt their family, they may experience various behavioral symptoms. They may show disrespect to their siblings and parents. In addition, they might lash out, challenge boundaries, or project their emotional struggles. Furthermore, other family members may modify their behaviors to manage the stress of it all. Some may try and help the individual using drugs or alcohol to protect them from getting into trouble. Thus, becoming the enabler. Others may take on the role of caretaker and attempt to compensate, providing care that may be lacking. These are only a few examples of the dysfunctional roles that family members might play.

Addiction: A Family Disease

In a recent study at Texas Tech University, the saying, “addiction is a family disease” took on new meaning. Not only is the addicted brain affected by the substances. In addition, the family members’ brains actually change as well. The study found that family members suffer as a result of the addict’s behavior. The prefrontal cortex of one using substances shuts down when faced with temptation or triggered to use drugs. Research shows the family members’ prefrontal cortex malfunctions as well. Hence, studies validate that addiction is a family disease. Parents and siblings can actually crave patterns. They seek to rescue and care-take their addicted family member. Therefore, this is similar to the substance abuser who craves their substance of choice. 

The conclusion of the Texas Tech study, states the following: 

“The present study provides preliminary evidence that family members’ symptomatic behaviors associated with a loved one with a substance use disorder (such as fear-based behaviors), as hypothesized, may be related to altered brain functioning. Given these findings, problematic symptoms and behaviors may likely not decrease simply because the loved one struggling with a substance use disorder finds abstinence or engages in a process of recovery. Should altered pathways be present in the brains of affected family members as has been found in individuals struggling with substance use disorders, it becomes of great importance to help family members recognize their own personal need for support, therapeutic treatment, and/or recovery. Part of the recovery process should include family-based therapeutic support, and it is therefore important to make sure that the appropriate systemic and relationship training is available to helping professionals.” 

Family Therapy Changes Outcomes

This study proves the concept of addiction as a family disease. The entire family needs to participate in treatment. Family members who turn to support groups such as Al-Anon or partake in family therapy find great success. Consequently, they are able to change their behavior. Also, families learn “the three C’s”: You didn’t cause it, you can’t cure it, and you can’t control it. If the alcohol or substance user is the only one getting treatment, it’s a vacuum. And then they go back into an environment where the rest of the family is still unwell. Hence, the individual’s likelihood of success goes down. The disease of addiction is viciously contagious. Therefore, it is important for everyone to seek help. 

If you or a loved one is struggling with alcohol addiction, drug addiction, mental health problems, The Redpoint Center is here to help. You are not alone. The Redpoint Center treats both adults and youth struggling with addiction and alcohol. To learn more, call us 888-509-3153.

Canine-Assisted Psychotherapy in the Treatment of Addiction

By | Addiction, Community, Media, Mental Health, Misc, Therapy, Treatment | No Comments

Canine-Assisted Psychotherapy utilizes therapy dogs in mental health and substance abuse treatment. Animals enhance the benefits of therapeutic modalities. As an animal-friendly program, we see the impact animals have each day. Furthermore, there are many ways that dogs impact us through the human-animal bond.

Research shows Canine-Assisted Psychotherapy benefits:

  • Behavioral problems
  • Addiction
  • Learning Disabilities
  • Autism
  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • PTSD
  • Treatment Resistance

Dogs provide unconditional love and acceptance. This can promote health and healing when used in substance abuse and mental health therapy. Also, this positivity provides clients with healthy bonds. The connection creates an opportunity for clients to feel self-love and self-acceptance. Furthermore, animals can help decreases stress and anxiety. Hence, this is positive for the therapeutic process.

Dogs, Emotions, and Self-Regulation

Dogs provide immediate feedback. And they connect on nuanced levels. They can reflect emotions. Also, they help people to identify emotions and practice emotional regulation. Therefore, this allows clients to practice healthy coping skills. This is enhanced with the support of a clinical therapist.

The therapeutic experience can be challenging and stressful at times. A therapy dog can help to decrease anxiety. In addition, time with animals can increase feelings of well-being. This value is significant. As a result, physical activity and dog training can help to improve physical health, communication, and patience.

Benefits of Canine-Assisted Therapy include:

  • Strengthen the therapeutic alliance between therapist and client
  • Increase self-confidence
  • Improve psychosocial functioning
  • Decrease symptoms of anxiety, depression, and PTSD.
  • Decrease Stress
  • Improve communication skills
  • Better Mood
  • Improve anger management
  • Better physical health

It is important to ensure that both the client and the therapy dog are comfortable. Also, it is key to ensure that both will benefit from the therapeutic encounter. Consequently, this happens prior to engaging in canine-assisted interventions.

At Redpoint, we are lucky to have our own therapy dog named Parker. Parker is generally in the office on most days of the week. He is happy to sit in on a client’s therapy session if he isn’t busy chewing his toys.

Studies reveal the efficacy of animal-assisted modalities. In conclusion, animals have a positive impact. Our furry friends bring love and more!

If you or a loved one is struggling with alcohol addiction, drug addiction, or mental health concerns, we are here to help. The Redpoint Center treats both adults and youth struggling with addiction and alcohol abuse. Learn more about our program.  Call us any time 888-509-3153.

More information on Canine-Assisted Psychotherapy:

  • Incorporating animal-assisted therapy in mental health treatments for adolescents: A systematic review of Canine-Assisted Psychotherapy

Melanie G. Jones, Simon M. Rice, Susan M. Cotton

  • Research on Benefits of Canine-Assisted Therapy for Adults in Nonmilitary Settings

Janet S. Knisely, Sandra B. Barker, and Randolph T. Barker

  • Patient benefit of dog-assisted interventions in health care: a systematic review Martina Lundqvis, Per Carlsson, Rune Sjödahl, Elvar Theodorssonand   Lars-Åke Levin

The Redpoint Center Staff’s Favorite Songs About Addiction, Drug Use and Recovery

By | Addiction, Community, Media, Mental Health, Misc, Therapy, Treatment | No Comments

Stories of addiction and drug abuse have worked themselves into our culture in the form of books, music, theater and songs for centuries.   Often times, a song we love is actually about addiction and drug abuse and we aren’t even aware of it until we take the time to really look at and listen to the lyrics.  This isn’t surprising, considering the fact that addiction and drug use is common among singers, songwriters and musicians that we listen to on a daily basis.  We also know of a multitude of extremely talented singers and members of popular bands who have died from addiction and drug overdoses., so it is not uncommon to find stories about drug and addiction in their music.

 

Just last month, the staff at The Redpoint Center, an outpatient substance abuse treatment program in Longmont, Colorado, shared their favorite movies about addiction and recovery.  We therefore found the next logical step was for us to recount our favorite songs about addiction, drug use and recovery.  The following is a summary of our musings, in no particular order, along with a link to the song and the staff member who chose it.

 

  • Semi-Charmed Life by Third Eye Blind- This song is the title track from the rock band’s self-titled debut album that was released in 1997.  Despite the easy going and peppy pop sound of this song, it is actually about using crystal meth and the shiny looking outside of people who are sick and hurting on the inside.ur medical director, Dr. Honor Ashbaugh.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=beINamVRGy4

 

  • Under the Bridge by The Red Hot Chili Peppers- “Under the Bridge” appears on the Red Hot Chili Pepper’s fifth album, titled Blood, Sweat, Sex and Magik. Anthony Keidis, the rock band’s lead singer, wrote the lyrics of this song to depict feelings of loneliness and despondency, and to relay the impact that a heroin addiction had on his life.  This song was picked as a favorite by our clinical director, Nikki Summers, and therapist Quddus Maus.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLvohMXgcBo

 

  • Hurt by Nine Inch Nails- Hurt is a song that appears on Nine Inch Nail’s second studio album, The Downward Spiral, released in 1994. The song includes references to self-harm and heroin addiction.  Others contend that the song acts as s suicide note written by the song’s protagonist.  Nonetheless, the entire album is about a period in the singer’s life when he abused drugs and fell into a deep depression.  This song, and the cover by Johnny Cash, was picked as a favorite by The Redpoint Center’s founder, Cody Gardner.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kPz21cDK7dg

 

  • Hurt cover by Johnny Cash- In 2002, Johnny Cash covered the song “Hurt”.  Reznor, the Nine Inch Nails lead singer, said he was flattered when Johnny Cash wanted to cover this song, but was worried that it was a “bit gimmicky”.  After seeing the video, however, which was best music video of the year by Grammy’s and CMA Awards, Reznor liked what he saw.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vt1Pwfnh5pc

 

  • Soul to Squeeze by The Red Hot Chili Peppers- “Soul to Squeeze” was released as a B-side on the The Red Hot Chili Peppers “Give it Away” and “Under the Bridge.” It was then released as a single in 1993.  “Soul to Squeeze” Is thought by some as depicting the entire mental process between addiction and recovery. It focuses heavily on what recovery has to offer rather than glorifying or self-deprecating the addictive thought process.  This was picked  a asfavorite by The Redpoint Center’s Drew Dyer..

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0XcN12uVHeQ

 

  • Lost in the Cold by Twiddle- “Lost in the Cold” was also picked as a favorite by Drew Dyer. In his own words, the song reminds him of “grabbing onto the fear of recovery and facing it rather than hiding from it.”

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u0NyOcf7h8c

 

  • Heroin by The Velvet Underground- The song “Heroin” was released by The Velvet Underground on their 1967 debut album called The Velvet Underground & Nico. The song was written by Lou Reed and beautifully depicts heroin use and abuse.  The song “Heroin” neither endorses nor condemns the use of heroin, which has made it a troubling song in the eyes of some listeners.  This song was picked as a favorite by The Redpoint Center’s wellness coordinator, Shane Niemeyer.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qFLw26BjDZs

 

  • Not if You Were the Last Junkie on Earth, by The Dandy Warhols- This song was released in 1997 on the second studio album released by The Dandy Warhols, called The Dandy Warhols Come Down.  The song, according to front man Courtney Taylor-Taylor, was written about his girlfriend (at the time) who got addicted to heroin while he was on tour. This song was picked as a favorite by The Redpoint Center therapist, Desmond Cohen.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=APrpB-i4d_E

 

  • Down on the Bottom by The New Basement Tapes- Down on the Bottom was the first song recorded by The New Basement Tapes on their album titled “Lost on the River.” The lyrics were written by Bob Dylan in 1967, and are interpreted to be about drinking and hitting rock bottom with nowhere to go but up.  This song was picked as a favorite by The Redpoint Center’s Katie Fischer.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cXXEG6kY96E

 

  • You’ll Never Walk Alone by The Dropkick Murphy’s- This song first appeared in a 1945 musical called Carousel. It has been covered by many different bands and musicians, and appeared on The Dropkick Murphys album “11 Short Stories of Pain and Glory” when it was released in 2017.  This song, explains bassist and vocalist Ken Casey, came on when he was leaving a wake for a friend who had overdosed on opiates.  It summed up to him how he was feeling at the time- sad but knowing that there is hope. This song was picked as a favorite by The Redpoint Center’s therapist Stephanie Winkler.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q8SK8JHKn1k

 

  • Lover I Don’t Have to Love by Bright Eyes- “Lover I Don’t Have to Love” was released by the American, Indie Rock band as a single in 2002. The Redpoint Center’s family advocate, Taylor Cole, picked this song as a favorite about addiction and shared her words.  “I listened to this song throughout the throws of my addiction when I was touring with a band the year before I got sober. I knew I was an addict and I was not ready to get sober. I wanted to put myself into so much pain it would force me to get sober or I would just not make it. Every time I listen to it, I remember that feeling and am grateful that I don’t have to live like that anymore.”

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iuXkhE0VMcw

 

  • Staying Alive by Cursive- The song “Staying Alive”, by Cursive, was also picked by Taylor Cole as her favorite song about recover. She quotes, “Bad ass song that makes my insides feel warm and fuzzy. Choosing life and looking forward.”

 

 

  • Suicidal Thoughts by Biggie Smalls- “Suicidal Thoughts” was the last song on the debut album, “Ready to Die”, released by Notorious B.I.G. in 1994. Although not strictly about addiction, the song was listed as very meaningful to The Redpoint Center’s founder, Cody Gardner, who states that he “used to write the verses of this song on all his notebooks” while in rehab.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s4M8GjgfG9k

 

  • Alive by Sia- “Alive” is the lead single from the Australian singer songwriter’s 7th studio album, titled “This is Acting.” The Redpoint Center’s admissions director, Rachael Messaros, notes that this song is one of her favorites about recovery. In her words, “On my 6th sobriety birthday I put all of my songs on shuffle, and this song came on. I cried because I was like, holy shit, I survived.”

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t2NgsJrrAyM

 

  • Billy Walker, by Israel Darling- Billy Walker was released in on the album by Israel Darling titled “Dinosaur Bones & Mechanical Hands.” This song was picked as a favorite by one of The Redpoint Center’s therapists, Jay Fullam. In his own words, “I heard this song when I got sober at an open mic.  It really stuck with me and I listened to it regularly during my first year of sobriety.”

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q2rS0chMWFw

 

  • Needle and the Damage Done by Neil Young–“Needle and The Damage Done” first appeared on the Harvest album which was released in 1972. This song was written by Neil Young to describe the destruction caused by the heroin addiction of musicians he knew, including his friend and Crazy Horse bandmate, Danny Whitten. It previews the theme of a later album, “Tonight’s the Night”, that expresses Young’s grief over the subsequent overdose deaths of both Whitten and Bruce Berry, who was a roadie for Young and Crazy Horse. This song was picked as a favorite by The Redpoint Center’s Executive Director, Donnie Hagenbart.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hd3oqvnDKQk

 

 

  • Rehab by Amy Winehouse- Rehab appeared on Winehouse’s second and final album, Back to Black, in 2006. The lyrics are in fact autobiographical, and describe Winehouse’s refusal to enter into a rehabilitation clinic for substance abuse and addiction. The song won three Grammy awards at the 50th Winehouse, as most know, subsequently died of alcohol poisoning on July 23rd, 2011.  This song was picked as a favorite by one of the Redpoint Center’s adolescent therapists, Bridget Camacho.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KUmZp8pR1uc

 

  • Mansion by NF- The song Mansion, by NF (which stands for Nathan Feurstein) is a song on this American rapper’s debut album, titled the same, which was released on March 31, 2015. This song was picked by The Redpoint Center’s Samantha Jackson. In her own words, “I like this song because for so long I was in my head about a lot of things and I thought keeping that to myself was a lot safer than talking about it or getting help. Also, I thought using was a good way to take care of my problems, but it just acted as a temporary fix. This song is a good reminder to myself that I don’t want to be in such a dark place again. It also puts me in the mindset of when I was still using and how much I didn’t like what I was doing.”

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uF5QE3-ox4o

 

 

We hope you enjoy this compilation of The Redpoint Center staff’s favorite songs about addiction, drug abuse and recover.  If you think you or your loved one might have an addiction or problem with drug or alcohol use, The Redpoint Center can help.  Please call us with any questions, as we’re here to help.

 

If you or a loved one is struggling with alcohol addiction, drug addiction, Mental Health problems, The Redpoint Center is here to help. The Redpoint Center treats both adults and youth struggling with addiction and alcohol. To learn more about our Longmont Drug Rehab, call 888-509-3153.

EMDR in the Treatment of Addiction

By | Addiction, Community, Mental Health, Therapy, Treatment | No Comments

EMDR to Address Trauma During Addiction Treatment

EMDR is a powerful tool for healing trauma. Studies show that trauma is a risk factor for addiction and substance use disorder. In addition, treatment of trauma is key for individuals to recover from addiction. At the Redpoint Center, we use several different types of treatments for trauma. These modalities differ from talk therapy. One reason talk therapy doesn’t always effectively address trauma is that the memories are stored in the hippocampus, part of the midbrain. Talk therapy doesn’t effectively access these memories stored in the midbrain—it tends to involve the utilization of our frontal lobes. Furthermore, trauma is often stored in the body, requiring somatic attention. Hence, EMDR is a powerful intervention.

Using EMDR to Cope With Trauma and Stress

EMDR (eye movement desensitization and reprocessing) therapy is a positive tool. It helps us access and process memories stored in the midbrain. Our use of EMDR is expanding and helping more people with issues that cause distress. People with substance abuse issues commonly have a history of trauma. In addition, they struggle to cope with stress and often benefit from EMDR.

Research shows that EMDR causes changes in brain chemistry that reverse the damage caused by trauma or acute stress. Bessel van der Kolk, an expert, and researcher, in brain chemistry and trauma, shares several brain studies to support this approach. His PET scan photographs of the brain before and after EMDR sessions show the benefit.

EMDR and the Brain

The PET scans of one who is remembering trauma light the amygdala in the brain. This is part of the limbic system that is responsible for emotions, survival instincts, and memory. The amygdala is activated when one experiences trauma and acute stress. It is the “smoke detector” that scans the environment and lets us know of a threat or event that is relevant to survival.

When people experience a threat the amygdala becomes activated. The frontal lobe, where cognition and understanding take place, is quite dim because the amygdala is more heightened. Hence, when people are experiencing “normal” day-to-day happenings, the frontal lobe is bright and outshines the amygdala.

Studies Show the Benefits of EMDR

In one study, van der Kolk had several individuals go through EMDR sessions. Before the sessions, the PET scans showed a brain in a trauma state. After the EMDR sessions, the brain appeared normal when the client was bringing to mind the same stressful event. The memory was no longer held as a traumatic memory but as a normal, processed memory.

We found another study where van der Kolk showed that subjects with a complicated traumatic history, after six EMDR sessions, had greatly reduced PTSD symptoms that continued to decrease even more for up to six months after the study.

We do not know exactly how psychotherapy affects the brain’s neurobiology. However, we do know that when people are upset, their brains cannot process information normally. EMDR is similar to what occurs naturally during dreaming or REM (rapid eye movement) sleep.

During REM sleep, the information from the day is being processed. When people experience trauma, the amygdala becomes hyperactive and stores traumatic information and memory. This makes it difficult to process this information. EMDR creates the same stimulation that occurs during REM sleep. This assists the brain in processing the trauma or issues related to stress.  The end result is that people see disturbing information in a new and less distressing way. Consequently, they are better able to process information.

Getting Started with EMDR in Treatment

We know addiction is connected to acute stress and often trauma. Once a client has dealt with trauma and acute stress through EMDR, he or she is better able to cope. Therefore, they experience healthy relationships, cope with stress, and live a happier life.  In addition, people can recover from addiction since they are no longer, or less affected, by their distress.

If you or a loved one is struggling with alcohol addiction, drug addiction, Mental Health problems, The Redpoint Center is here to help. The Redpoint Center treats both adults and youth struggling with addiction and alcohol. Learn more about our Longmont Drug Rehab, by calling 888-509-3153.

The Therapeutic Benefits of Laughter

By | Addiction, Community, Media, Mental Health, Misc, Therapy, Treatment | No Comments

It is a common occurrence amongst therapists to joke that if they bring their clients to tears then they know they’ve done something right. We believe that laughter can be one of the most powerful tools at our disposal. 

Other reasons why laughing is therapeutic:

Connection: Laughter increases one’s ability to be close with others, and is an expression most often used in a social context. We are 30 times more likely to laugh if we are with another person. Cognitive neuroscientist Sophie Scott said we laugh “to show people that you understand them, that you agree with them, and you are part of the same group with them. You’re laughing to show them you like them, you might even love them. Laughter is doing all that emotional work for you.”

See what else Sophie has to say in her Ted Talk Why We Laugh

Nervous System Regulation: laughter reduces sympathetic nervous system activity (fight or flight response) and increases parasympathetic system activity, which can relax the whole body, thus reducing the impact of stress on the body and mind.

Read more about laughter and the nervous system here.

Perspective: it offers a new way to look at a situation and

“Humor and laughter can shift perspective and change the way the our mind views or experiences an event.”

Emotional Health

Emotional health, but physical health have been linked to laughter as well.  Norman Cousins, who wrote Anatomy of an Illness (1979), describes his experience using laughter to help him live a longer, and more pain free life while suffering from an illness affecting the immune system. According to Cousins:

  • Laughter:
    • Releases endorphins in the brain that fight physical pain.
    • Protects our immune systems.
    • Increases antibodies that fight infection.
    • Increases natural killer cell activity. Natural killer cells attack cancerous cells in the body.
    • Improves cardiovascular health
    • Activates neuro-chemicals in the brain, such as dopamine, acting as a natural antidepressant.

And one final thought; did you know there is something called “Laughter Yoga”? Make sure to check out this Ted Talk by Dr. Madan Kataria, the pioneer of Laughter Yoga, which is now a worldwide practice for improving overall health and wellbeing.

If you or a loved one is struggling with alcohol addiction, drug addiction, Mental Health problems, The Redpoint Center is here to help. The Redpoint Center treats both adults and youth struggling with addiction and alcohol. To learn more about our Longmont Drug Rehab, call 888-509-3153.

The Paradox of Comfort

By | Therapy, Treatment

com·fort:

a state or situation in which you are relaxed and do not have any mentally or physically unpleasant feelings

Comfort is a funny thing. In small doses it allows us to recover and marshal our resources, but in excess it can become crippling. Most of us unwittingly allow unhealthy levels of comfort into our life. This typically presents as settling for comfort at the expense of putting up with some level of discomfort to help us grow.

The truth is that actively pursuing resistance makes us stronger. Friction and resistance mark the boundary between our current ability level and our potential. Challenging our boundaries extends their borders, thereby expanding the field of possibilities available to us. Where there was once a boundary, now there is newfound strength of character and capability in its place.

This principle applies to every aspect of our lives, including exercise and diet. If we don’t have access to motivation, we can manufacture it. When we are tempted to make poor choices we can summon the force of will to overcome the seduction of complacency. You can contend with the familiarity of comfort when you should be exerting mental or physical effort over an aspect of your life you want to improve. With practice, over time, we can make discomfort and resistance our allies.

Here are a couple of questions to consider.

  • What are some of the habits you wish you had?
  • Can you identify a few areas of your life that you want to improve?

All of our aspirations depend on sacrifice and discomfort. We have access to the same 168 hours each week, yet those who continually reach and strive to get out of their comfort zone are able to achieve much more with their time. The greatest gift we can give the world and everyone we meet along the way is the gift of self-improvement.

In conclusion, the paradox of comfort means something different to each of us. The question is, how can you best apply the virtue of welcoming discomfort in your own life? Personally, I see opportunity for growth and challenge in little moments. I embrace being cold or hot. I work out late or early, often outside in the dark. I read when I would rather watch television. I write when I would rather not. Each moment offers a chance to step over our smaller self and closer to our more ideal self.

Have a good week, and FULLY get after it.

Shane Niemeyer is the Director of Wellness Services at The Redpoint Center, a drug and alcohol rehabilitation facility in Longmont Colorado. The Redpoint Center specializes in helping those suffering from alcoholism and addiction in Colorado to create a compelling vision for their future that encompasses recovery and sobriety. Each participant at The Redpoint Center has the opportunity to work with Shane both individually and in a group setting.

If you or a loved one is struggling with alcohol addiction, drug addiction, Mental Health problems, The Redpoint Center is here to help. The Redpoint Center treats both adults and youth struggling with addiction and alcohol. To learn more about our Longmont Drug Rehab, call 888-509-3153.

How to Help Someone Struggling with Thoughts of Suicide

By | Mental Health, Therapy, Treatment

According to a report released by The Centers for Disease Control, suicide rates have risen in all but one state in the United States between 1999 and 2016. In more than half of all deaths in 27 states, the person who committed suicide had no known mental health condition when they took their lives.

In 2016, nearly 45,000 suicides occurred in The United States. Particularly alarming are the statistics showing that in 2016, over 115,000 suicide attempts by adolescents were reported in U.S. hospitals.

The general thinking on the cause of this rise of suicidal ideation in teens and adults seems to have its roots in a lack of mental health treatment in the U.S., a rise in Substance abuse, alcohol abuse, and drug addiction, and a continued rise in the connection between cell phones, social media, and depression.

According to a 2017 study, teenagers are more likely to consider suicide when they spend more than 5 hours per day on their devices. Even though teenagers are considered to be under more pressure at school, this does not turn out to affect depression rates among those studied.

It’s important to know that there are things you can do if you know someone who is struggling with suicide:

  1. Reach out for help, suicidal ideation/depression/and substance abuse are treatable conditions. If you know someone who is struggling, they don’t have to suffer in silence. Google mental health treatment near me or addiction treatment near me to find a local resource. Tell the person they do not have to be ashamed, this is something that can be resolved.
  2. Drugs and Alcohol. Some drugs and alcohol generally act as depressants. If the person saying they are suicidal or depressed is a regular user, getting help for addiction and alcohol use can change depression and suicidal ideation.
  3. Take threats seriously. If someone you know says they are suicidal, contact your local non-emergency line and have the professionals assess them. Other resources can be found here.
  4. Listen and share. Listen to the person who is saying they are suicidal, share your feelings and let the person know that you care about them and are willing to walk with them as they get help.
  5. Get outside. If someone is claiming they are depressed or have had suicidal urges in the past, fresh air and exercise can quickly change their outlook.
  6. Weapons. If you have weapons in the house, they should be removed immediately. Suicide by firearm is the main method of suicide in the America.

At The Redpoint Center we know that suicide and addiction or alcohol abuse go hand in hand. Our staff are professional trained to handle mental health crisis’s, substance use and abuse, and suicidal ideation. We specialize in working with teens, young adults, and adults who struggle with these co-occurring conditions.

If you or someone you know is struggling with suicide, depression, or substance problems, call us at (888) 509-3153 to speak with a highly trained admissions coordinator. If our services don’t fit, we will personally help you find resources that do.

Thinking About Rehab

By | Addiction, Therapy, Treatment

If you have started thinking about going to addiction treatment or alcohol treatment, you have begun a journey that is often very difficult, and you will likely waver back and forth. We know that taking this step is the start of a wonderful new life and only those who are brave and committed will see it through. Below are some tips from those who have considered this step in their life.

When thinking about drug rehab or alcohol rehab it is important to first understand what the options are that exist. Below is the basic continuum of care provided for substance abuse treatment, if you or someone you know is thinking about rehab, the first step is to speak to someone who can assess you for which level of care is the best fit (note, there does exist other types of treatment, but below are the ASAM levels of care):

  • Detoxification, otherwise known as detox:
    • Detox is usually a 3-7 day medical process that can be done in a hospital setting or in a house setting.
    • Detox is always overseen by a licensed medical doctor and registered nurses.
    • Detox is designed to help someone become physically free and clear of the drugs and/or alcohol.
    • Detox generally will have some type of group therapy and case management designed to help figure out next steps and aftercare.
  • RTC or Primary Residential Treatment:
    • RTC is the general type of rehab we think of when we think of treatment.
    • RTC usually lasts between 30 and 90 days.
    • Generally RTC has a medical provider onsite and includes group and individual therapy.
    • RTC is designed to continue stabilizing, educating and preparing the person for aftercare.
    • RTC can include many holistic therapies such as equine, yoga, nutrition, etc.
    • Although the majority of Americans believe that RTC is the main type of treatment, there is no evidence anywhere that 30 days of treatment can fix or solve what for most people is a multi-year, sometimes multi-decade condition.
  • PHP (Partial Hospitalization Program) or Day Treatment:
    • PHP Is generally the next stepdown level from RTC and it includes a person living at home and attending 5 days per week, 5 hours per day or outpatient treatment.
    • PHP includes medical services, case management, group therapy and individual addiction therapy.
    • This can be done for those that cannot leave their job or home for 30-90 days.
    • This also can be done as a stepdown for those coming from RTC and re-integrating.
    • PHP Generally last 2-4 weeks.
  • IOP (Intensive Outpatient):
    • IOP consists of 3 days per week for 3 hours per day.
    • This level of care can be completed for most without having to sacrifice their jobs or families.
    • IOP generally can be found both mornings and evenings.
    • IOP can be completed at a rate of 5 days per week in certain situations.
    • IOP generally includes individual therapy, group therapy, case management and urine drug testing.
    • IOP generally lasts a minimum of 90 days.
    • IOP generally does not include medical or nursing services.
  • OP (Outpatient):
    • Outpatient care can be anything that is less than 9 hours (IOP) level of care.
    • OP generally consists of 1-2 group therapy sessions, ongoing urine drug testing, case management and individual therapy.

At The Redpoint Center, located in Longmont Colorado, we believe that people come to us needing specific treatment planning and services for their lives. Although we offer “PHP” and “IOP” levels of care, we believe that we are much more than an IOP. During treatment with us each participant will receive the above outlined PHP/IOP services as well as individualized nutrition, fitness, recovery coaching, family and medical services. We believe that as each person comes with unique needs, creating a compelling vision for each person’s future begins with individualized, high quality, recovery-oriented services.
If you or someone you know is thinking about rehab in Colorado or drug rehab near me, or anywhere in the country, call us at (888) 509-3153 to speak with a highly trained admissions coordinator. If our services don’t fit, we will personally help you find resources that do.

We are here to help.



Address

The Redpoint Center
1375 Kenn Pratt Blvd
Suite 300
Longmont, CO, 80501


Phone

(888) 509-3153


 

Contact Us.