Category

Therapy

The Paradox of Comfort

By | Therapy, Treatment

com·fort:

a state or situation in which you are relaxed and do not have any mentally or physically unpleasant feelings

Comfort is a funny thing. In small doses it allows us to recover and marshal our resources, but in excess it can become crippling. Most of us unwittingly allow unhealthy levels of comfort into our life. This typically presents as settling for comfort at the expense of putting up with some level of discomfort to help us grow.

The truth is that actively pursuing resistance makes us stronger. Friction and resistance mark the boundary between our current ability level and our potential. Challenging our boundaries extends their borders, thereby expanding the field of possibilities available to us. Where there was once a boundary, now there is newfound strength of character and capability in its place.

This principle applies to every aspect of our lives, including exercise and diet. If we don’t have access to motivation, we can manufacture it. When we are tempted to make poor choices we can summon the force of will to overcome the seduction of complacency. You can contend with the familiarity of comfort when you should be exerting mental or physical effort over an aspect of your life you want to improve. With practice, over time, we can make discomfort and resistance our allies.

Here are a couple of questions to consider.

  • What are some of the habits you wish you had?
  • Can you identify a few areas of your life that you want to improve?

All of our aspirations depend on sacrifice and discomfort. We have access to the same 168 hours each week, yet those who continually reach and strive to get out of their comfort zone are able to achieve much more with their time. The greatest gift we can give the world and everyone we meet along the way is the gift of self-improvement.

In conclusion, the paradox of comfort means something different to each of us. The question is, how can you best apply the virtue of welcoming discomfort in your own life? Personally, I see opportunity for growth and challenge in little moments. I embrace being cold or hot. I work out late or early, often outside in the dark. I read when I would rather watch television. I write when I would rather not. Each moment offers a chance to step over our smaller self and closer to our more ideal self.

Have a good week, and FULLY get after it.

Shane Niemeyer is the Director of Wellness Services at The Redpoint Center, a drug and alcohol rehabilitation facility in Longmont Colorado. The Redpoint Center specializes in helping those suffering from alcoholism and addiction in Colorado to create a compelling vision for their future that encompasses recovery and sobriety. Each participant at The Redpoint Center has the opportunity to work with Shane both individually and in a group setting.

If you or a loved one is struggling with alcohol addiction, drug addiction, Mental Health problems, The Redpoint Center is here to help. The Redpoint Center treats both adults and youth struggling with addiction and alcohol. To learn more about our Longmont Drug Rehab, call 888-509-3153.

How to Help Someone Struggling with Thoughts of Suicide

By | Mental Health, Therapy, Treatment

According to a report released by The Centers for Disease Control, suicide rates have risen in all but one state in the United States between 1999 and 2016. In more than half of all deaths in 27 states, the person who committed suicide had no known mental health condition when they took their lives.

In 2016, nearly 45,000 suicides occurred in The United States. Particularly alarming are the statistics showing that in 2016, over 115,000 suicide attempts by adolescents were reported in U.S. hospitals.

The general thinking on the cause of this rise of suicidal ideation in teens and adults seems to have its roots in a lack of mental health treatment in the U.S., a rise in Substance abuse, alcohol abuse, and drug addiction, and a continued rise in the connection between cell phones, social media, and depression.

According to a 2017 study, teenagers are more likely to consider suicide when they spend more than 5 hours per day on their devices. Even though teenagers are considered to be under more pressure at school, this does not turn out to affect depression rates among those studied.

It’s important to know that there are things you can do if you know someone who is struggling with suicide:

  1. Reach out for help, suicidal ideation/depression/and substance abuse are treatable conditions. If you know someone who is struggling, they don’t have to suffer in silence. Google mental health treatment near me or addiction treatment near me to find a local resource. Tell the person they do not have to be ashamed, this is something that can be resolved.
  2. Drugs and Alcohol. Some drugs and alcohol generally act as depressants. If the person saying they are suicidal or depressed is a regular user, getting help for addiction and alcohol use can change depression and suicidal ideation.
  3. Take threats seriously. If someone you know says they are suicidal, contact your local non-emergency line and have the professionals assess them. Other resources can be found here.
  4. Listen and share. Listen to the person who is saying they are suicidal, share your feelings and let the person know that you care about them and are willing to walk with them as they get help.
  5. Get outside. If someone is claiming they are depressed or have had suicidal urges in the past, fresh air and exercise can quickly change their outlook.
  6. Weapons. If you have weapons in the house, they should be removed immediately. Suicide by firearm is the main method of suicide in the America.

At The Redpoint Center we know that suicide and addiction or alcohol abuse go hand in hand. Out staff are professional trained to handle mental health crisis’s, substance use and abuse, and suicidal ideation. We specialize in working with teens, young adults, and adults who struggle with these co-occurring conditions.

If you or someone you know is struggling with suicide, depression, or substance problems, call us at (888) 509-3153 to speak with a highly trained admissions coordinator. If our services don’t fit, we will personally help you find resources that do.

Thinking About Rehab

By | addiction, Therapy, Treatment

If you have started thinking about going to addiction treatment or alcohol treatment, you have begun a journey that is often very difficult, and you will likely waver back and forth. We know that taking this step is the start of a wonderful new life and only those who are brave and committed will see it through. Below are some tips from those who have considered this step in their life.

When thinking about drug rehab or alcohol rehab it is important to first understand what the options are that exist. Below is the basic continuum of care provided for substance abuse treatment, if you or someone you know is thinking about rehab, the first step is to speak to someone who can assess you for which level of care is the best fit (note, there does exist other types of treatment, but below are the ASAM levels of care):

  • Detoxification, otherwise known as detox:
    • Detox is usually a 3-7 day medical process that can be done in a hospital setting or in a house setting.
    • Detox is always overseen by a licensed medical doctor and registered nurses.
    • Detox is designed to help someone become physically free and clear of the drugs and/or alcohol.
    • Detox generally will have some type of group therapy and case management designed to help figure out next steps and aftercare.
  • RTC or Primary Residential Treatment:
    • RTC is the general type of rehab we think of when we think of treatment.
    • RTC usually lasts between 30 and 90 days.
    • Generally RTC has a medical provider onsite and includes group and individual therapy.
    • RTC is designed to continue stabilizing, educating and preparing the person for aftercare.
    • RTC can include many holistic therapies such as equine, yoga, nutrition, etc.
    • Although the majority of Americans believe that RTC is the main type of treatment, there is no evidence anywhere that 30 days of treatment can fix or solve what for most people is a multi-year, sometimes multi-decade condition.
  • PHP (Partial Hospitalization Program) or Day Treatment:
    • PHP Is generally the next stepdown level from RTC and it includes a person living at home and attending 5 days per week, 5 hours per day or outpatient treatment.
    • PHP includes medical services, case management, group therapy and individual addiction therapy.
    • This can be done for those that cannot leave their job or home for 30-90 days.
    • This also can be done as a stepdown for those coming from RTC and re-integrating.
    • PHP Generally last 2-4 weeks.
  • IOP (Intensive Outpatient):
    • IOP consists of 3 days per week for 3 hours per day.
    • This level of care can be completed for most without having to sacrifice their jobs or families.
    • IOP generally can be found both mornings and evenings.
    • IOP can be completed at a rate of 5 days per week in certain situations.
    • IOP generally includes individual therapy, group therapy, case management and urine drug testing.
    • IOP generally lasts a minimum of 90 days.
    • IOP generally does not include medical or nursing services.
  • OP (Outpatient):
    • Outpatient care can be anything that is less than 9 hours (IOP) level of care.
    • OP generally consists of 1-2 group therapy sessions, ongoing urine drug testing, case management and individual therapy.

At The Redpoint Center, located in Longmont Colorado, we believe that people come to us needing specific treatment planning and services for their lives. Although we offer “PHP” and “IOP” levels of care, we believe that we are much more than an IOP. During treatment with us each participant will receive the above outlined PHP/IOP services as well as individualized nutrition, fitness, recovery coaching, family and medical services. We believe that as each person comes with unique needs, creating a compelling vision for each person’s future begins with individualized, high quality, recovery-oriented services.
If you or someone you know is thinking about rehab in Colorado or drug rehab near me, or anywhere in the country, call us at (888) 509-3153 to speak with a highly trained admissions coordinator. If our services don’t fit, we will personally help you find resources that do.

Longmont Drug Rehab

By | addiction, Therapy, Treatment

If you are seeking help for a loved one in Longmont, CO we know how challenging it can be to find the right drug rehab for yourself or your loved one. At The Redpoint Center, we compassionately employ holistic drug treatment methods and an entirely comprehensive approach in treating each individual in our program.

We know that the decision can be difficult and that searching the internet for the right program can sometimes make it more confusing. In light of this, allow us to clarify some things as this is no longer an issue that we can ignore.

The research tells us that only 1 in 10 Americans with a drug addiction will receive treatment.[1] Furthermore, we know that addiction to all drugs including heroin, methamphetamine, prescription medications, marijuana, benzodiazepines, and many others are on the rise in Longmont Colorado. [2]

In response to these growing numbers, Boulder County has created the Boulder County Opioid Advisory Committee to specifically address these issues in our county. [3] Included in the Opioid Advisory Committee is public education, drug abuse prevention, opening access to addiction treatment and mobilizing the county’s resources. Noted in the Opioid Advisory Committee, Longmont, CO has the highest rate of Prescription Opioid related deaths. [4]

In response to this issue that is plaguing our community, The Redpoint Center was founded.  Our founder, Cody Gardner was born in Longmont and is raising his family in Boulder County, and felt it necessary to give this community a valuable resource for those struggling.

At the Redpoint Center we believe that early detection, intervention and comprehensive addiction treatment are all part of solving the problem of addiction in Colorado. At our Drug Rehab, we will use a client-centered, evidence-based approach where each participant will be comprehensively assessed to determine the proper level of care. Following assessment each participant will create an individualized treatment plan specific to their needs. This treatment plan will identify trauma, therapeutic goals, medication management, practical recovery skills and many other therapeutic tools to help each person to find lasting recovery.

If someone you know is abusing drugs, alcohol, or prescription medications and are seeking drug rehab in Longmont or Boulder County, we encourage you to call our admissions line today to speak with someone who can help. If you are unsure of what the signs of addiction are, we have placed a list below. We are here to help.

The signs of drug use and addiction can vary depending on the person and the drug, but some common signs are:

  • impaired speech and motor coordination
  • bloodshot eyes or pupils that are larger or smaller than usual
  • changes in physical appearance or personal hygiene
  • changes in appetite or sleep patterns
  • sudden weight loss or weight gain
  • unusual smells on breath, body, or clothing
  • changes in mood or disinterest in engaging in relationships or activities

If a person is compulsively seeking and using a drug(s) despite negative consequences, such as loss of job, debt, family problems, or physical problems brought on by drug use, then he or she is probably addicted. And while people who are addicted may believe they can stop any time, most often they cannot and need professional help to quit. Support from friends and family can be critical in getting people into treatment and helping them to stay drug-free following treatment. [5]

 

 

 


 

[1] https://addiction.surgeongeneral.gov/executive-summary

[2] https://www.drugabuse.gov/about-nida/organization/workgroups-interest-groups-consortia/community-epidemiology-work-group-cewg/meeting-reports/highlights-summaries-january-2014-4

[3] https://www.bouldercounty.org/families/addiction/opioid-advisory-group/

[4] https://assets.bouldercounty.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/opioid-advisory-background.pdf

[5] https://www.drugabuse.gov/faqs

Our Team for Drug Addiction Recovery

By | addiction, Mental Health, Therapy, Treatment

Our team at The Redpoint Center is diverse in practice and unified in purpose.

Because each of our clients is unique and will respond to their treatment as such, the team at The Redpoint Center offers multidisciplinary therapeutic interventions, each designed to meet and to heal individuals in a way that yields lasting change.

If you have questions about The Redpoint Center’s program or would like to speak with an Admissions Coordinator, please don’t hesitate to call (888) 509-3153.

 

MEET THE TEAM