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Meditation for People Who Hate Meditating

By Addiction, Alcohol rehab, Community, Featured, Mental Health, Misc, Therapy, Treatment

Most people are aware of the benefits that mediation brings; reduced stress and anxiety, increased self-awareness, improved memory and sleep, just to name a few. Nobody is going to argue that focusing the mind and practicing mindfulness isn’t a good thing. The problem is that for many, the path to finding that quiet place seems to be very narrow. A lot of people have an idea in their head about what mediation is: sitting quietly, alone, and turning off your thoughts for extended periods of time. While this is certainly one method that many use to practice mediation, the reality is that it does not work for everybody. The good news is that there are an almost infinite number of ways that someone can practice getting out of their own head and practicing mindfulness. Here are just three examples of meditative practices for people who hate meditating.

Mindful Cooking

 This isn’t the hurried meal that gets thrown together after a long day at work. It’s crucial to not rush when practicing mindful cooking in order for it to be a contemplative and soothing activity. Just as you would make time to exercise, set aside some time to prepare a meal. Consider cooking as a form of self-care rather than a duty. By approaching meal preparation in this manner, you may immerse yourself in it rather than just concentrating on getting it done. The goal of meditation is to enjoy the journey.

Of course, you get to eat what you make. That is the best aspect of mindful cooking. Traditional meditation certainly has many health advantages, but those advantages are not often as apparent as the immediate enjoyment of a wonderful meal. Feel good about yourself since you not only made time for yourself to unwind, but you also prepared a satisfying meal. The best way to nourish both your body and mind is to thoughtfully prepare your food.

The process of cooking a meal intuitively incorporates all five of the senses. Be intentional about paying attention to them during the activity. The sounds of the knife hitting the cutting board, the smells of the onions sautéing, the feel of the dough in your fingers. Cooking a meal is the perfect space to connect with yourself and your surroundings using your senses.

 

Exercise

 Mindful exercise is a great way to relieve stress. Even though rhythmic exercise alone can help you reduce stress, the benefits increase if you practice mindfulness at the same time.

In order to engage in mindful exercise, you must be totally present in the moment—paying attention to how your body feels rather than your regular cares or anxieties. Concentrate on the feelings in your limbs and how your breathing accompanies your movement to “switch off” your thoughts.

Focus on the physicality of each step when you’re walking or running, for instance—the sensation of your feet contacting the ground, and the rhythm of your breathing as you move. If you find that your mind starts to wonder, try to bring them back to your breathing and movement.

 

Puzzles

A good jigsaw puzzle can be captivating, whether you’re finishing it by yourself or with family or friends. They also promote mindfulness and assist with brain function, which are both long-lasting advantages. Being mindful involves paying attention to our bodies’ current activities and our feelings. In today’s quick-paced, technologically dependent environment, it’s a useful ability to have.

The level of thought, patience, and focus required by puzzles is sure to stretch the intellect. It’s meditative and enjoyable to focus while sorting among the pieces or gazing at the image for extended periods of time. Our brains release dopamine as we put two puzzle pieces together, which enhances our motivation, mood, and memory.

Spending hours putting together hundreds of puzzle pieces may seem like a mindless activity but can in fact be a great exercise in mindfulness if some intentionality is incorporated. Think about the challenge in front of you and understand that no external or internal factors are going to affect the end result of this project in front of you. Allow yourself to get lost and forget what time it is, enjoy your heart rate slowing down. Enjoy the process.

 

 

The Importance of Community in Recovery

By Addiction, Alcohol rehab, Community, Featured, Longmont Drug Rehab, Mental Health, Misc, Treatment

When somebody is trying to recover from a battle with drugs and alcohol, there are several things that need to be addressed.  Physically, the drugs and alcohol need to leave the body and the person needs some time to heal.  There is often a need for clinical or therapeutic work so that the recovering addict and start to understand themselves and their relationship with drugs on a deeper level.

There is one piece of the recovery process that is often overlooked: the need for community.  Active addiction can be a very lonely place, and sometimes those who are experiencing that loneliness forget about the importance of human connection.  There are so many benefits to sharing experiences with other people, all of which can lead to a better understanding of oneself and one’s importance to society.

Isolation Is A Menace

The need to withdraw leaves us trapped in the grip of our addiction with little hope of recovery. The problem with isolating ourselves while we are still actively abusing drugs is that we keep reinforcing the lies the drug is telling us. The drug convinces us that we must have it to exist. We have to block everyone and everything out of our hearts and brains in order to keep that outlet in our life.

We need forms of social connection that provide coping skills, support, and opportunity for a healthy lifestyle because humans are, by nature, social beings. Disconnection can worsen melancholy, sleeplessness, low self-esteem, worry, and stress. Even if it’s only a small group of people, having a strong support system is crucial.

Leaning On Others

An important realization in early recovery is the understanding that you are not alone.  The idea that there could be others out there who understand the pain and misery that you’ve gone through, and have even experienced it themselves, is truly liberating.  The walls that are built up during the isolation of active addiction and be torn down, and the benefit of shared group experience can be utilized.

During the healing process, developing relationships with others can help you write a new chapter in your life.  When people in recovery surround themselves with healthy, like-minded individuals it creates a space for them to learn more about themselves and others.  The opportunity to openly exchange ideas and information with people who have the best interests of others in mind is an invaluable tool for growth.

A Whole New Life

Change is not necessarily comfortable for anyone, and that is often especially true for addicts.  Part of what keeps people in active addiction is the inability to break free from the lifestyle and routines that have been developed.  Despite the dangers inherent in the day-to-day activities of a using addict, many tend to find comfort in that familiar minutiae.

Ceasing the use of drugs and alcohol is often just the first step on the road to living a health lifestyle.  When the brain fog caused by substance abuse is cleared, mental and physical health can become more of a priority.  Yoga, exercise, and meditation are just a few examples of practices that can lead to someone become wholly healthy after getting sober.  Whatever mental, physical, and spiritual health looks like to each individual; the excitement comes in finding what speaks to you.  A life free from the bonds of active addiction provides an opportunity to create new routines and participate in new activities that promote a healthy mind and healthy life.

Giving It Back

When people are in the midst of a battle with drugs and alcohol, their thoughts and actions often become singularly focused on doing whatever necessary is to maintain the addiction.
The ways that the addiction is kept alive are often highlighted by thoughts and actions that are most accurately described as selfish and self-centered. The need to escape becomes so consuming that it can be difficult for addicts to make the basic needs of other people, or even themselves, a priority.

Many people find that one of the greatest joys of recovery is the renewed pleasure that is found in getting outside of oneself and helping others. Doing things from a place of selflessness and a desire to help others can keep the passion for recovery alive. In short: giving back can keep you sober. The best part is that there is no limit to the ways that people can be of service and help others. Whether that is service work within a recovery community, doing volunteer work, or simply sharing experience and hope with someone in need, the opportunities to give back are almost infinite.

New, Deadlier Version of Fentanyl

By Addiction, Community, Mental Health, Treatment

Synthetic opioids’ increased availability on the black market poses a threat to worsen the opioid overdose epidemic now raging in the United States. New synthetic opioids are evolving, being abused, and being trafficked, all of which pose serious risks to public safety.

A POWERFUL NEW OPIOD HAS MADE IT’S WAY TO COLORADO

A new deadly narcotic has surfaced in Colorado. “Pyro” (N-pyrrolidino Etonitazene) has already claimed the lives of at least one Denver resident. Pyro is a highly potent synthetic opioid having a chemical structure similar to that of the synthetic opioid Etonitazene, which is a restricted narcotic.

According to the Mesa County Sheriff’s Office, Pyro has flecks of a darker blue color all over it and is almost identical in look to Fentanyl the counterfeit and deadly version of Percocet (M30’s). Replicating the image of both fentanyl and M 30’s – Pyro is branded on one side with an “M”, and on the other, a “30”.

EVEN MORE POWERFUL THAN FENTANYL

The drug is anywhere between 1,000 and 1,500 times more powerful than morphine, and 10 times more powerful than Fentanyl. Fentanyl, for reference, is about 100 times more powerful than morphine.

Pyro, unlike Etonitazene and it’s relative Fentanyl, does not exist in any earlier medical literature or patents, according to the Center for Forensic Science Research, & Education.  It is a brand-new medicine with a distinct mechanism of action that was probably developed outside of the influence of the American pharmaceutical industry. According to a report by the CFSRE, in just two years, at least 21 fatalities have been related to the substance, and up to 44 fatalities may be attributable to Pyro use.

OVERDOSE AWARENESS

A Pyro overdose resembles the majority of other opioid overdoses almost exactly, with respiratory depression being the most common fatal symptom.  Fortunately, the drug responds to Naloxone, and if the poison is immediately neutralized, the devastating effects of an overdose can be avoided.

For more information on Narcan and overdose education, please visit the Narcan website.

If you come across PYRO, please contact law enforcement immediately. You can also report drug-related crimes anonymously to Northern Colorado Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477).

 

Redpoint Center Blog Communication in Recovery

Communication in Recovery

By Community, Mental Health

An Interview with Redpoint Center team member, Wendy Stine, Clinician and Program Manager for Northern Colorado

Communication in recovery is one of our greatest tools. So much of what we experience when we are in self-destructive behaviors is a lack of communication. Hence, communication in recovery and relationships is vital. The ability to express our needs and listen to others deeply allows for understanding and connection. Furthermore, we know that connection is very important and vulnerability plays a role as well. Whether at work, romantic relationships, friends, or therapists, expressing yourself honestly and being heard compassionately can provide a medium for growth and healing. We asked our counselor Wendy Stine a few questions about what healthy communication looks like, and how to get in touch with our feelings. After all, we need to understand what we are feeling to express it. 

Why Communication Matters in Recovery

Redpoint: What are some tips for getting in tune with our feelings, especially in early recovery?

Wendy: It’s always helpful to start from a place of groundedness. This can be as easy as taking a few deep breaths with eyes closed and being really “in your body.” Then ask yourself what do I feel- happy, mad, sad, hurt, or afraid? Keep the options simple. Maybe write a little bit about in a journal. The important thing is not to judge the feelings.  Don’t analyze anything- just acknowledge.

RP: What are some ways to soothe ourselves when we are feeling overwhelmed by emotion?

W: Some easy and quick ways to soothe oneself would be some focused breath work; I like to count my inhales, pause a second and count the exhales. Counting helps distract the brain. If you can manage to breathe in slowly to the count of 4, hold for one count and slowly exhale to a 6 or 7 count, you will calm the mind and body. Repeat the cycle a few times.

I also love getting outside for calming. If I can take my shoes off in the grass, even better! Sometimes I’ll just sit in my yard and look at the sky, hear the birds, and smell the fresh air. Works wonders.

It’s ok to give yourself a time out! Even a quick nap or “mind shutdown” can bring relief.

And there’s always the quick call or text to a supportive friend.

Relationship Goals: Healthy Communication

RP: What does healthy communication look like? What are some tips on being a more active listener/supporting others when communicating?

W: Healthy communication looks like being responsible for your own words and actions. Take ownership of the way you feel. “ I feel hurt when…” is more effective than “You make me feel”. I try and start feeling statements with “I”.  Don’t keep things bottled up. People are not mind readers, and often don’t know what we’re feeling. 

It’s super important to be a good listener in any relationship. Sadly, many people are busy planning a response rather than actually hearing what is said. Listen as if you are not going to answer. Ask questions, make eye contact, and stay off your mobile phone! It’s helpful to paraphrase back what is being said- it shows you are paying attention; it feels good to be a friend! 

When we have empathy and understanding for ourselves, we can extend that same compassion to others. Communicating with the intention of getting closer to those you love or interact with,  will always foster healthy conversations and progress for a better life. 

If you or someone you know needs mental health support, we are here.

Photo courtesy of unsplash~

Redpoint Center Blog Sober Friendships in Recovery

Friendship in Sobriety

By Community, Mental Health

Friendship is very important in our lives. Along with the simple fact that friendship provides key support, relationships are a big part of our mental health and well-being. The people we surround ourselves with and the environment we create is a crucial part of maintaining sobriety in recovery. In addition, studies show that friendships play a vital role in recovery. Often, those we spend time with before recovery indulged in our addictions as well. Making a drastic life change to recovery can cause a lot of shifts in our lives. One significant change can be the shifts in our friendships. 

Sober Friendships

As many can attest, early sobriety can cast a glaring light onto everything we do. Our life long friends who share addictive behaviors may seem more destructive (which they often are!) and unhealthy. You may come to see some friends could perhaps use an AA meeting. In addition, these running buddies often mirror our behavior and thinking. Furthermore, recognizing the unhealthy influence of old friends, or the lack of connection without the d.o.c. you once bonded over, can be a grieving process.

Letting Go of Destructive Relationships

It can be hard to admit that certain friendships only existed when you were using. Also, when you start to feel a lack of depth in a relationship, it can be painful and even isolating. Hence, it is best to assess things slowly. You do not have to “break up” with all your friends right away. And, more importantly, we have to remember we can’t make them get sober, too. Cultivating a curated list, however, of positive and negative aspects of friendships can be quite helpful. This is a big part of learning to set boundaries. Also, it will help you know what sober relationships are positive for you. Maybe you no longer go to your friend’s house who is an active user. However, you talk on the phone from time to time so they feel supported. You may express to a close friend that you no longer wish to golf on Sundays because folks are drinking. True friends will hear these requests and respect them. When they are not heard, or when a friend takes offense, this can be the indicator that this friendship may not be healthy for you.

Finding Our Sober Friendship Tribe

There is a lot to be said around finding like-minded people in recovery. Some people love being sober and feel it has saved their lives. Others do not or think AA, NA, GA, and on, are cults. Undeniably, however, sober living will put you in touch with people going through the same experiences as you. AA is not the only group for those seeking a sober life. There are many resources for support groups or non-12-Step addiction recovery groups that can help one branch out and meet other sober people.  If you have a passion or hobby that you already know about or want to explore, take a class! Even connecting with those not in recovery, but who share common interests, can lead to deeper, healthier friendships. It can be tricky with Covid-19 restrictions at the moment, but zoom meetings and online classes and support groups are always taking place. There is a world-wide network of people in recovery. Though it may be intimidating at first, taking the first vulnerable step towards connection can open up a whole new life. Also, almost everyone in recovery was new at some point and experienced the same fear and need to connect.

It may feel scary, to shift out of old support systems and comfortable friendships. You may feel isolated and lonely. But “nature abhors a vacuum.” In psychics, when there is a vacuum in space or empty space, nature seeks to fill it. So when we create space in our life by releasing what no longer serves us, new life, new friendships, will come. 

Image courtesy of unsplash

Redpoint Center Blog Spiritual Life

Sobriety and The Gifts of a Spiritual Life

By Community

by Katherine Clancy

My spiritual life means a great deal to me. It is through awareness and spiritual experiences that I connect to a power greater than myself. And it is this connection that holds deep meaning for me. Almost every person in recovery that I know (myself included) has a spiritual experience (or many) that leads to or strongly instills the idea of getting sober. It is often unexplainable unless experienced. I used to try and explain certain experiences to friends or family and they wouldn’t fully get it. In addition, they may even be concerned or poke fun. “Oh, Katherine is our ‘spiritual one.’ When they said spiritual, I heard what they meant: crazy. I used to get offended. Hence, I  stopped talking about it. In fact, I started to question it: am I insane? Am I really losing it? Is it connecting dots that are not connected? But, I could not shake the feeling of these experiences. They felt warm. And, they felt relieving. What’s more, they were deep and pervasive. They evoke a feeling that I now describe as the feeling of truth. 

Self-Care—A Spiritual Life

As my life and sobriety progressed these experiences did not cease, they grew. I might feel too shy to share in a meeting, and someone random shares exactly what is on my mind. Maybe I pray for a sense of connection while driving. and then hear the friendly toot of a newly sober friend passing me at that exact moment. Perhaps I see or hear phrases or see a certain type of animal so many times it challenges coincidence. I call these synchronicities. These moments are part of my spiritual awareness. The unexplainable things that happen lead me to believe there may be a higher intelligence. 

I grew up Catholic and I am used to phrases like archangels and praying for divine guidance. But the spiritual teachings I began tapping into are not acceptable to bring up to my Catholic grandmother. I also have well-intentioned East Coast family and friends that hardly know how to feel their own feelings let alone speak about their emotions or the intelligence of trees. I found myself isolated when these realms of thought were new. Now, I know better. In addition, I made mistakes trying to “take my friends with me” on this spiritual journey. Or, as my one friend calls it “pushing someone through the door.” As a result, I’ve learned how to process these experiences thoughtfully, with others who share my interests and who I trust. It’s really about self-care.

Tips for Sharing & Integrating Spiritual Experiences: 

If you want to share an experience, I usually assess the situation with the phrase “small and safe.”

Share Small

Share in small amounts, with one or only a couple of people you trust. I wouldn’t recommend entertaining an entire party with a 3-hour story about how you were thinking about an important decision and then you saw a license plate with the numbers 555 on it, which is a sign for you because you read a book about the synchronicities of triple numbers and 555 means a connection with higher consciousness, and then after you saw the license plate you saw a billboard which you felt was speaking directly to you because…(etc, you get the picture.) Impart simple phrases in conjunction with your feelings like: “I felt that I am being shown a sign today about this decision.” If people want to know more about your spiritual life, they will ask. 

Share Safe

Share with friends or family members who you know are respectful and open-minded. Don’t try to CONVINCE anyone that the experience has to be true for them too. This can be damaging for your connection to that person, yourself, and your higher truth. When you feel called to, share with no expectation. It could start a beautiful conversation or it could yield an interested ‘hm’ and nothing else, and that’s fine. 

There are many ways to process spiritual experiences. Choose what works for you.

Journal. Journaling is therapeutic. Certain experiences can be difficult to integrate so talking it over with yourself by way of journaling can be a healing exercise on many levels. Respect yourself enough to put down on paper what you felt to be true, even if you are nervous someone will read it and think you’re crazy. I feel these experiences are more about our connection to ourselves and our own personal truths more than anything. When you start with validating your own spiritual experiences, you can share from a grounded space which I can almost guarantee will resonate within someone else.

Listen. DO listen respectfully when someone else shares a ‘sign’ or synchronicity that has a higher meaning for them. If we are quick to judge another’s experience and b.s., we may be doing that internally to ourselves, invalidating ourselves from the inside. 

Find your tribe. If you do not have people directly in your life to talk about spiritual things with, books and youtube are amazing resources. “Surround” yourself with like-minded people who share similar experiences. There are meetup groups for just about anything you can think of, and there’s this super cool sobriety meetup group called AA which has foundations in the acceptance of a higher spiritual power ;).

Substance Abuse and Spirituality

I believe alcoholism and addiction are about an intense disconnection from life, friends, family, and most of all, ourselves. We disconnect from a spiritual life when we are active in substance abuse. If we look at nature, everything is intertwined. The web of life is delicately balanced in harmony. We have a right to feel connected. We are a part of this grand organism called earth too. So, what some would call ‘woo woo’ I would call natural. Consequently, if you want to put the spider outside instead of stepping on it, and someone calls you a treehugger, do it anyway. And, be proud because you’re doing something that feels right for you.  If you want to sage your vacation home and end up yelled at by your father while you are deep in prayer (true story), do it. Because connection in sobriety is a lifeline. The connection with your own personal truth is immeasurably powerful and will light the way for others to do the same. 

Redpoint Center Mental Health Addiction Treatment Blog Feel Connected

How to Feel Connected During Tough Times

By Community, Mental Health

by Wendy Stine, Addiction Counselor & Program Manager at The Redpoint Center

There’s no doubt that many of us are feeling frazzled, ungrounded, and anxious. These feelings can make us feel isolated even more than we already are. Also, tumultuous times like this can be stressful. Our familiar routines may have become almost obsolete without a clear path to normalcy. In addition, it can be really hard to sustain isolation, for anyone. But, it’s even harder when struggling with mental health or substance issues.

Tips on How to Feel Connected

While we may be spending more time at home with family, we are also feeling more disconnected from the world. Our usual interactions with coworkers, fellow gym rats, and neighbors are on hold. In addition, social distance guidelines tell us to keep a 6-8 foot distance, but we are wired for human contact. Research tells us that this lack of connection during COVID-19 breeds mental health concerns, including anxiety and depression. So, what’s a human to do?
  • Tap into the network. To start, we can feel connected when we interact mindfully, such as using social media for one to one interactions, or for live classes instead of commenting on old posts or general scrolling
  • Do something for someone else. Service work is a beautiful way to feel part of. We can also feel connected when we make cookies for a neighbor, a senior center, or cut someone else’s lawn.
  • Meditation is a powerful practice. Also, certain types of meditation are about feeling connected. Metta is a longstanding loving-kindness meditation style. This loving-kindness meditation is a way to get quiet and embody compassionate awareness. It helps to ensure we feel connected.
  • Reach out. Is there a friend or loved one you’re missing? Write a heartfelt letter.
While there is no substitute for a hug from a friend, a smile from your favorite coworker, or a simple touch on the shoulder, it can help us feel like we are connected to the human race. At least for the time being. May we all feel connected during this challenging time.

It’s OK to Seek Support

If you or a loved one is struggling with alcohol addictiondrug addiction, or mental health problems, The Redpoint Center is here to help. The Redpoint Center treats both adults and youth struggling with addiction and alcohol abuse. To learn more about our Longmont Drug Rehab in Boulder County Colorado, call 888-509-3153.
Even if Redpoint is not the appropriate facility, we will help you find what will work best for you and your family.
There is nothing wrong with struggling. It is OK to go through hard times. Many of us know the pain and the way back. We are here to help.
YOU ARE NOT ALONE. 
Image courtesy of unsplash.
Redpoint Center Service Work During Coronavirus

The Healing Power of Service Work

By Community
by Redpoint Team member, Wendy Stine, certified interventionist and addictions counselor
Service work is a powerful healer. “When I get nervous, I focus on service,” is a saying that a spiritual mentor taught me years ago in Hawaii. It’s been amazingly helpful these last few precarious weeks. As we experience semi-sheltered existence, service work provides.

What is Service Work?

In “Pre-Covid Times” (PCT), I managed to stay involved in service work through my 12-Step Groups and my training with Native American Tribes across North America. I took several pieces of training with White Bison, which is a nonprofit that integrates Native American spirituality practices. These include the medicine wheel, the Sacred Four Directions, ceremonies, etc., and incorporate these with recovery, along with the 12 Steps. It is a Native American organization founded to help its members, as well as those in recovery, heal from trauma, abuse, and addiction. I’ve also done service work with the Lakota Sioux on Pine Ridge Rez, the Ojibway in the Midwest, and the Couer d’ Alene Tribes. In addition, I have spoken in Northern Canada. Service work is different in this new reality. I’ve had to find a few more creative ways to stay committed to helping others while keeping my mind too occupied to fall into anxiety and self-pity.

Ways to Be of Service

There are lots of ways to show up for others. During COVID-19, we’ve had to be a bit more creative about this. But, it’s possible. Sometimes, it’s as simple as asking someone how they’re doing? Just remember that intention goes a long way. The thought truly does count. Here are some tips to help others:

Nourish others

One avenue I use now is to offer my cooking skills to others. I cook for a couple of people in my recovery community. Each person is struggling with significant physical health issues and mental health issues. Both individuals helped ME a ton in my early sobriety. I can go to the store, do some meal prep, and get some warm soup or a few meals boxed up and delivered to their door. It’s my way of saying thank you, and thank you to The Universe for my good health and good fortune. It’s not a heavy lift for me, but it would be for them.

Thoughtfulness

There are always ways to be thoughtful. Perhaps the local town needs some assistance in distributing supplies. It can feel scary to put yourself out there, both psychologically and physically right now, but there are safe ways to show up. Wear your mask when in groups, gloves if needed, and keep the distance. Your support can mean a great deal to others.

Donate

Donations always help during times like these. And right now there are a lot of services and organizations that need support. Here are some ways to help your community and offer resources toward those in need. Along with donating money, you can go to a blood drive, offer your skills to organizations in need, or donate materials.

Reach out and connect

Write a letter. I’ve also decided to write a few actual handwritten notes (on that stuff called stationery) to our local assisted living home residents. There are many who feel isolated right now and could use some human connection. It’s pretty easy to do, just call a center and ask for a few names of residents that get little to no outside interactions. I’m told that now residents wait by the door for the mail!
My challenge to you is to find ways to get out of yourself; to contribute to the greater good, and create some goodwill. There are so many small acts of kindness that we can bestow upon each other. Let’s do something good, and in the process, heal ourselves.
Redpoint Center COVID-19 Quarantine Laughter Healing

COVID-19 and Finding Humor in Difficult Times

By Community, Media
Humor makes the world go around. But it’s not always easy to find. We all go through challenges in our lives and before COVID-19, we were no doubt experiencing some of this. Maybe we suffered a job loss, or are dealing with a health concern. Perhaps we just broke up with someone or had a fight with a friend. This is life and we’re all in it. Quarantine just makes everything more intense. We’re home, with a lot of time on our hands. Also, we may be feeling stress. That’s only natural.
There is no question that we’re living in some seriously stressful times. Between the constant barrage of breaking news, financial worry, and social isolation, we are taking an emotional beating. This is nothing to minimize. On a global scale, we are witnessing hardship and suffering. And the flip side is, we are also witnessing empathy, compassion, joy, and giving. People are volunteering where they can, reaching out to those in need, supporting those they love. Many are taking advantage of telehealth to support their mental health. A lot of good is happening. The vernacular is “we’re in this together.” Furthermore, we need to see the good moments to shine the light. Consequently, humor goes a long way right now.

Humor Heals

Finding humor amidst all can be daunting for many of us. But the research shows laughter is beneficial for optimal emotional health. In addition, it sparks a sense of interconnectedness. Here are few ways to find the humor, in case you don’t live with a comedian:
  • Check out the comedy section on your favorite TV streaming service, and look for an old favorite as well as something new. If you’re wondering what to watch, Jon Krasinski has released a heartwarming and hilarious series called Some Good News that highlights funny, positive moments that happen each week during the Coronavirus quarantine across the world.
  • Subscribe to receive texts or alerts from some industry greats such as Jim Gaffigan or Jimmy Fallon.
  • Read the Onion.
  • Buzzfeed, Bored Panda, and great clean jokes.com are a few humorous sites to peruse.
  • Pick up a funny book.
  • Call that funny friend that always puts a small on your face.
  • Post a “joke of the day” on the fridge for others in your home to enjoy.
Above all, stay safe and remember that is temporary. You are not alone.
Redpoint Center COVID-19 Quarantine Music as Medicine

Quarantine Music to Soothe the Soul

By Community, Mental Health, Therapy

During COVID-19 quarantine, music is vital. While we experience these uncertain times, many are grappling with anxiety. In addition, we feel stress about the future. On top of this, we have an unprecedented amount of free time on our hands. It is in times like these when people with mental health disorders and addictions struggle. Furthermore, with the isolation, it becomes easier for the brain to drift into a negative headspace. A great way to feel connected throughout the chaos is music. Studies show that music has a positive impact on our mental health. Also, now, more than ever, musical artists are releasing music to entertain and provide hope to all of us stuck inside wondering what to do next. It’s a perfect time to crank the tunes.

Quarantine Music Soothes the Soul

 

During quarantine, music can be a soothing force for good. Go back through an old playlist you made years ago and reminisce. Create a new playlist comprised of songs about how you feel right now. Make a dance playlist and let loose. No one is around to judge you and who cares even if they were?! If ever there was a time to let loose and fly that freak flag, it’s now. Dance like no one is watching!
You could also make a playlist of music to express how you’re feeling. Write a song, create some instrumentals on GarageBand, or take a song you already know, and change the words if you want. Pull out that old Casiotone and get crafty. Ask your friends to send you what they’re listening to right now, and maybe you’ll find some new favorites.
Quarantine music can be a great distraction from the overwhelming sense of despair that can come and go in waves. Use music to navigate the feelings and sit in them for a little while. Then, find something upbeat, and turn the volume up until you can’t help but dance a little!

Quarantine Tune Tips

Here are some recommendations from our team. Streaming services, like Spotify, offer COVID-19 playlists. In addition, Vox published a quarantine survival playlist, and if you just need a few moments of hilariousness, this viral video from a family replicating a classic Journey music video is pretty epic. To top it off, Will Smith offers chill beats playlist on his YouTube channel for some smooth vibes.
If you or someone you love is ready to reach out for support, give Redpoint a call. We’re in this with you.
Image courtesy of OC Gonzalez via unsplash