Tag

Boulder County Mental Health & Drug Rehab |

Redpoint Center Treatment Interventions

What is an Intervention?

By | Addiction, Alcohol rehab, Longmont Drug Rehab, Mental Health, Treatment

Interventions are a strong first component of recovery. Not only do they help families through a complex process, but they also provide professional guidance for treatment. Furthermore, interventionists help reduce the burden of shame and stigma. This value is immeasurable. Over the past 15 years, the stigma of addiction in America is decreasing. What used to be considered a moral or ethical failing is now considered a treatable condition. Groups like Facing Addiction, SAHMSA, and Shatterproof, work tirelessly to help others. In addition, these nonprofits help Americans understand that addiction and alcoholism can be overcome through treatment, communities, and cultural compassion. Interventionists do the same and offer powerful support along the way.

As more people learn that addiction is a treatable condition, people ask, “How can I get someone help?” Furthermore, when someone is in destructive patterns, it can be hard to stop. Also, it can be even harder to convince them they need to change their ways.

What is an Intervention?

Premiering on March 6, 2005, “Intervention,” an A&E TV show, depicts family struggles when helping a loved one to seek drug rehab or mental health treatment. The show depicts participants using drugs and alcohol and subjects use interventionists as a wake-up call for family members. Interventionists are a key part of the process.

Interventionists usually make contact with the family, to start, to get a better understanding of what’s happening. Following an information gather process, the interventionist meets with the family to determine a course of action. In addition, they may work with clinical support to ensure the methods chosen are sound. They may also use various tactics to implore the person to accept treatment help. Following acceptance, the person goes immediately to treatment, generally for a minimum of 60–90 days.

In 15 seasons of the TV show, only 4 participants refused treatment. While the TV show can be helpful for families to understand the process there are many factors that can impact the experience. Therefore, it is best to find the right interventionist for each situation.

Questions to Ask Regarding Interventions

  • What credential does the interventionist possess? There most highly coveted credential is the Certified Intervention Professional (CIP).
  • What style of intervention will be used? Johnson Model, Love first , ARISE Model, Not all models are equal.
  • Is the interventionist a licensed therapist or registered psychotherapist?
  • What will happen if my loved one refuses? Will you continue to help?
  • Is there any type of follow-up from the interventionist following next steps?
  • Does the interventionist help with aftercare.

Make sure all of your questions are answered. As an advocate for your family, you have every right to make sure you have all the information you need. This is critical. It is also vital that you gain the support and trust of a seasoned professional in the field.  At The Redpoint Center, in Longmont, Colorado, we can help with conducting an intervention. Our licensed, trained staff conduct dozens of interventions a year. Supporting families as they navigate the complex system of treatment is a core component of our mission. We regularly refer families to different treatment center’s when our program is not the right fit. This is what a good interventionist does—they work for you.

Call today for a complimentary phone assessment. We are here for you and your family every step of the way.

You are not alone.

Yoga and Recovery

By | Mental Health

How do yoga and recovery go hand in hand? Does yoga evoke spandex and tricky poses? Or do you imagine a yogi chanting by the side of a river in India seeking enlightenment?

In the context of recovery and addiction treatment, yoga has a profound impact. Yoga is an opportunity to engage sensory, non-conceptual awareness. In addition, it decreases emotional reactivity, increases relaxation, and shifts our concepts of self. Hence, it is a way to take ownership of ourselves, our emotions, and our thoughts. Recovery is about becoming who you are meant to be.

According to Khanna and Greeson,

“Addictions are born as a result of ‘mindless’ states involving escapist attitudes, automatic thinking, emotional reactivity and social isolation” (2013, p.3).

So, what is the antidote to isolation? Presence, conscious thinking, emotional regulation, and connection.

What’s one way to find that? Yoga.

At the Redpoint Center, we recognize that being in recovery means more than not using substances or alcohol. It is about a neurobiological and relational shift. Furthermore, it is re-engagement in life. This is why we have yoga classes in our treatment program. And it’s why we are constantly exploring more ways that we can amplify one’s sobriety.

Yoga and Recovery Work Together

What does yoga do exactly? There remains academic uncertainty as to how and why yoga “works.” This ancient practice has been changing lives for centuries. One hypothesis is that yoga, particularly the meditative aspects of the practice, shift our “default mode network” (DMN). Our DMN is comprised of brain regions that are highly self-centered and self-referential.

When operating from the DMN the brain is hyper-focused on self-narratives. This provides little space to gain perspective on one’s life or behavior. However, studies show mindfulness activities like yoga and meditation increase the functional connectivity between the DMN and other brain networks. Furthermore, this results in a decrease in our attachment to the “narrative self” and an increase in the ability to regulate emotions. Consequently, we feel calmer. This allows us to put ourselves and our lives into perspective. Perspective is key. When we get caught up in our past and our personal pain, it is easy to get swept away by stress. We are no longer in the moment when stressed. We are in the past or the present and this causes suffering.

Yoga, Stress, and Trauma Treatment

Research shows that yoga decreases overall stress. And stress is known to trigger substance abuse relapse.

“The relaxation response achieved after yoga may confer the ability to face situations in a relaxed state of mind.” (Khanna & Greeson, 2013, p.3)

The practice also increases mindfulness. In addition, this supports individuals to target mindless thoughts such as the automatic behavioral and mental patterns associated with craving. Furthermore, yoga is gaining momentum as a treatment for PTSD and trauma. Dr. Bessel Van der Kolk practices and teaches trauma-sensitive yoga. He believes that,

“The big benefit of yoga is that you learn to breathe yourself into body positions that are potentially very triggering, but by having the voice of your yoga teacher and having that deep attention to trying to breathe while you do the posture, you can detoxify that particular interoceptive awareness into a piece of safety… once that part of your body becomes a safe part, you become liberated (Van der Kolk, 2015, p. 3).

As we know that trauma and addiction are deeply connected. This growing methodology brings somatic awareness to our known methods of healing. And many are finding contemplative practices to be powerful in transforming PTSD, stress, and trauma.

Yoga gives us the regular opportunity to move the body, practice mindfulness, and often leave feeling more relaxed. And that alone is a gift we all could benefit from.

If you or a loved one is struggling with alcohol addiction, drug addiction, mental health problems, we are here to help. Even if we are not an appropriate fit, we help you find what is the best solution for you and your family.

We treat adults and youth struggling with substance use disorder and alcohol addiction.

Learn more about our Longmont Drug Rehab, call 888-509-3153.

 

Images courtesy of Shutterstock

Sources

Khanna, S., & Greeson, J. M. (2013). A narrative review of yoga and mindfulness as complementary therapies for addiction. Complementary Therapies in Medicine,21(3), 244-252. doi: 10.1016/j.ctim.2013.01.008

Van der Kolk, Bessel (2015). The body keeps the score: Brain, mind, and body in the healing of trauma. New York (New York): Penguin Books.

 

Is Addiction a Family Disease? 

By | Addiction, Alcohol rehab, Community, Longmont Drug Rehab, Mental Health, Therapy, Treatment

Is addiction a family disease? What does this mean? Those suffering from addictive behaviors are suffering. And their loved ones suffer immensely, too. It goes without saying that living with substance use disorder is incredibly difficult. 

When someone using drugs begins to hurt their family, they may experience various behavioral symptoms. They may show disrespect to their siblings and parents. In addition, they might lash out, challenge boundaries, or project their emotional struggles. Furthermore, other family members may modify their behaviors to manage the stress of it all. Some may try and help the individual using drugs or alcohol to protect them from getting into trouble. Thus, becoming the enabler. Others may take on the role of caretaker and attempt to compensate, providing care that may be lacking. These are only a few examples of the dysfunctional roles that family members might play.

Addiction: A Family Disease

In a recent study at Texas Tech University, the saying, “addiction is a family disease” took on new meaning. Not only is the addicted brain affected by the substances. In addition, the family members’ brains actually change as well. The study found that family members suffer as a result of the addict’s behavior. The prefrontal cortex of one using substances shuts down when faced with temptation or triggered to use drugs. Research shows the family members’ prefrontal cortex malfunctions as well. Hence, studies validate that addiction is a family disease. Parents and siblings can actually crave patterns. They seek to rescue and care-take their addicted family member. Therefore, this is similar to the substance abuser who craves their substance of choice. 

The conclusion of the Texas Tech study, states the following: 

“The present study provides preliminary evidence that family members’ symptomatic behaviors associated with a loved one with a substance use disorder (such as fear-based behaviors), as hypothesized, may be related to altered brain functioning. Given these findings, problematic symptoms and behaviors may likely not decrease simply because the loved one struggling with a substance use disorder finds abstinence or engages in a process of recovery. Should altered pathways be present in the brains of affected family members as has been found in individuals struggling with substance use disorders, it becomes of great importance to help family members recognize their own personal need for support, therapeutic treatment, and/or recovery. Part of the recovery process should include family-based therapeutic support, and it is therefore important to make sure that the appropriate systemic and relationship training is available to helping professionals.” 

Family Therapy Changes Outcomes

This study proves the concept of addiction as a family disease. The entire family needs to participate in treatment. Family members who turn to support groups such as Al-Anon or partake in family therapy find great success. Consequently, they are able to change their behavior. Also, families learn “the three C’s”: You didn’t cause it, you can’t cure it, and you can’t control it. If the alcohol or substance user is the only one getting treatment, it’s a vacuum. And then they go back into an environment where the rest of the family is still unwell. Hence, the individual’s likelihood of success goes down. The disease of addiction is viciously contagious. Therefore, it is important for everyone to seek help. 

If you or a loved one is struggling with alcohol addiction, drug addiction, mental health problems, The Redpoint Center is here to help. You are not alone. The Redpoint Center treats both adults and youth struggling with addiction and alcohol. To learn more, call us 888-509-3153.

Canine-Assisted Psychotherapy in the Treatment of Addiction

By | Addiction, Community, Media, Mental Health, Misc, Therapy, Treatment

Canine-Assisted Psychotherapy utilizes therapy dogs in mental health and substance abuse treatment. Animals enhance the benefits of therapeutic modalities. As an animal-friendly program, we see the impact animals have each day. Furthermore, there are many ways that dogs impact us through the human-animal bond.

Research shows Canine-Assisted Psychotherapy benefits:

  • Behavioral problems
  • Addiction
  • Learning Disabilities
  • Autism
  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • PTSD
  • Treatment Resistance

Dogs provide unconditional love and acceptance. This can promote health and healing when used in substance abuse and mental health therapy. Also, this positivity provides clients with healthy bonds. The connection creates an opportunity for clients to feel self-love and self-acceptance. Furthermore, animals can help decreases stress and anxiety. Hence, this is positive for the therapeutic process.

Dogs, Emotions, and Self-Regulation

Dogs provide immediate feedback. And they connect on nuanced levels. They can reflect emotions. Also, they help people to identify emotions and practice emotional regulation. Therefore, this allows clients to practice healthy coping skills. This is enhanced with the support of a clinical therapist.

The therapeutic experience can be challenging and stressful at times. A therapy dog can help to decrease anxiety. In addition, time with animals can increase feelings of well-being. This value is significant. As a result, physical activity and dog training can help to improve physical health, communication, and patience.

Benefits of Canine-Assisted Therapy include:

  • Strengthen the therapeutic alliance between therapist and client
  • Increase self-confidence
  • Improve psychosocial functioning
  • Decrease symptoms of anxiety, depression, and PTSD.
  • Decrease Stress
  • Improve communication skills
  • Better Mood
  • Improve anger management
  • Better physical health

It is important to ensure that both the client and the therapy dog are comfortable. Also, it is key to ensure that both will benefit from the therapeutic encounter. Consequently, this happens prior to engaging in canine-assisted interventions.

At Redpoint, we are lucky to have our own therapy dog named Parker. Parker is generally in the office on most days of the week. He is happy to sit in on a client’s therapy session if he isn’t busy chewing his toys.

Studies reveal the efficacy of animal-assisted modalities. In conclusion, animals have a positive impact. Our furry friends bring love and more!

If you or a loved one is struggling with alcohol addiction, drug addiction, or mental health concerns, we are here to help. The Redpoint Center treats both adults and youth struggling with addiction and alcohol abuse. Learn more about our program.  Call us any time 888-509-3153.

More information on Canine-Assisted Psychotherapy:

  • Incorporating animal-assisted therapy in mental health treatments for adolescents: A systematic review of Canine-Assisted Psychotherapy

Melanie G. Jones, Simon M. Rice, Susan M. Cotton

  • Research on Benefits of Canine-Assisted Therapy for Adults in Nonmilitary Settings

Janet S. Knisely, Sandra B. Barker, and Randolph T. Barker

  • Patient benefit of dog-assisted interventions in health care: a systematic review Martina Lundqvis, Per Carlsson, Rune Sjödahl, Elvar Theodorssonand   Lars-Åke Levin

The Therapeutic Benefits of Laughter

By | Addiction, Community, Media, Mental Health, Misc, Therapy, Treatment

It is a common occurrence amongst therapists to joke that if they bring their clients to tears then they know they’ve done something right. We believe that laughter can be one of the most powerful tools at our disposal. 

Other reasons why laughing is therapeutic:

Connection: Laughter increases one’s ability to be close with others, and is an expression most often used in a social context. We are 30 times more likely to laugh if we are with another person. Cognitive neuroscientist Sophie Scott said we laugh “to show people that you understand them, that you agree with them, and you are part of the same group with them. You’re laughing to show them you like them, you might even love them. Laughter is doing all that emotional work for you.”

See what else Sophie has to say in her Ted Talk Why We Laugh

Nervous System Regulation: laughter reduces sympathetic nervous system activity (fight or flight response) and increases parasympathetic system activity, which can relax the whole body, thus reducing the impact of stress on the body and mind.

Read more about laughter and the nervous system here.

Perspective: it offers a new way to look at a situation and

“Humor and laughter can shift perspective and change the way the our mind views or experiences an event.”

Emotional Health

Emotional health, but physical health have been linked to laughter as well.  Norman Cousins, who wrote Anatomy of an Illness (1979), describes his experience using laughter to help him live a longer, and more pain free life while suffering from an illness affecting the immune system. According to Cousins:

  • Laughter:
    • Releases endorphins in the brain that fight physical pain.
    • Protects our immune systems.
    • Increases antibodies that fight infection.
    • Increases natural killer cell activity. Natural killer cells attack cancerous cells in the body.
    • Improves cardiovascular health
    • Activates neuro-chemicals in the brain, such as dopamine, acting as a natural antidepressant.

And one final thought; did you know there is something called “Laughter Yoga”? Make sure to check out this Ted Talk by Dr. Madan Kataria, the pioneer of Laughter Yoga, which is now a worldwide practice for improving overall health and wellbeing.

If you or a loved one is struggling with alcohol addiction, drug addiction, Mental Health problems, The Redpoint Center is here to help. The Redpoint Center treats both adults and youth struggling with addiction and alcohol. To learn more about our Longmont Drug Rehab, call 888-509-3153.

We are here to help.



Address

The Redpoint Center
1375 Kenn Pratt Blvd
Suite 300
Longmont, CO, 80501


Phone

(888) 509-3153


 

Contact Us.